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Symposium Schedule

*Christian Life and Worship credit is only available for those events marked with an asterisk—students are allowed up to four credits for the day.

Time & Location

Title

Description

All day

ART DISPLAY/

EXHIBIT

 

Barrington 201

Bezalel: Scenography in the Shadow of Eden

Art is a unique way to walk in the shadow of Christ, creating as He creates. Scenic design allows for a deeper level of this process as we create not only a beautiful picture, but an entirely unique atmosphere and space for catharsis. Theatre is a way to pursue the light and question the darkness in the world around us, and it pushes us to find beauty and hope in the midst of what often looks like tragedy. Children's theatre, specifically, is often turned to as a way to help kids grow and heal emotionally, and the technical elements of theatre allow them another outlet for developing practical skills with little risk involved. Participating in theater tech encourages them to be stronger critical thinkers and creators. “Bezalel: Scenography in the Shadow of Eden” demonstrates a beautiful and appropriate space for kids to grow as people and learn to see the world as if in the shoes of others.

 

Participants: Madeline Hopkins, Dr. Norm Jones

All day

 

ART DISPLAY/

EXHIBIT

 

KOSC Loggia

 

 

Life Between Pollution

 

This quilt "Life Between Pollution," inspired by Wasco/Tlingit artist Bernyce K Courtney's quilt titled "Life Between Sunsets," centers around the theme of how pollution affects the natural world while also offering hope in the connectedness we have with each other and with nature. The installation is intended to raise an awareness of the influential part Indigenous voices have in environmentalist discussions. Native Americans have endured generations of suffering and injustice due simply to the perceived inferiority of their value system. The hope in their situation comes, in part, from the world's desperate need for their value system to permeate global environmentalist discourse. By seeking out their voice, we cannot undo the atrocities of the past, but we can take small steps towards justice by giving ear to the voices and values we have so far ignored.

 

Participants: Hannah Fleth, Dr. Ines Jindra

All day

ART DISPLAY/

EXHIBIT

 

KOSC Loggia

 

 

Onward Reflections

This art installation shares the responses to a survey taken of graduating seniors regarding their internal posture towards graduation and the season of change that it often accompanies. Contained within the survey and presented in art form, graduates express their emotions as Anxious, Excited, Confident, Uncertain, Neutral, Prepared, Relieved, or Fearful and answer future-oriented questions.

  • What fears do you have when thinking about the upcoming season of graduation?
  • What do you hope will be true of your life one year from now?
  • Do you have any other thoughts to share on the topic of graduation?

Our hope is that this survey will serve as an encouragement to seniors and will provide an opportunity for the rest of our community to support this graduating class, acknowledging the mixed emotions that may accompany that experience.

 

Participants: Aaron Hicks, Hillary Collins-Oosting, Ansa Stamper

*9–10 a.m.

KOSC 127

God’s Not an Eagles Fan: A Holistic Understanding of the Christian Faith in Sport

Inspired by participation in varsity athletics at Gordon and through research, this presentation evaluates the current emphasis for Christian athletes to use their faith to evangelize. Does this simplify the correlation between faith and athletics? Could it even tend toward commodifying individuals? The work of the Desert Fathers and the example of their ascetic lifestyle will be compared with the emphasis of discipleship in spiritual formation to argue that discipleship is also vital to the lives of Christian athletes. In this world there is suffering, and athletes willingly choose to suffer in specific ways to become the best at their sport. This presentation will discuss the suffering of athletes and how the lessons from that suffering teach Christians to persevere in the hope of the Christian life.

 

Participants: Jenna Olson

*9–10:30 a.m.
AND
1–2:30 p.m.



Barrington 138
Cinema Room

White Rabbit, Red Rabbit

Through the medium of theater, playwright Nassim Soleimanpour hopes to send his voice and influence traveling around the world. His play White Rabbit, Red Rabbit addresses how people are fooled into obtaining a false sense of hope through multiple actions and objects.  The actor or actress performing the show has NEVER read the script or doesn't know what will happen. As soon as they step on stage, he or she performs and reads whatever appears in the script. Theatre provides an in-the-moment experience, where people’s guards are down and they are fully exposed to new ideas. This performance and session of audience feedback seeks to inspire healthy conversation and development as Christians through Soleimanpour’s work. Please do not look up the play before hand; it will ruin the experience.

 

Participants: Audrey Wilcox, Edward Lindem, Jessica Richmond, Drew Cleveland

*10–11 a.m.


JENKS 237

REACH Drama Ministry

REACH Drama Ministry seeks to engage people in whichever season they are in life and to bring some of God's truth to them in a slightly unorthodox way. REACH has skits on a range of topics, some of which are very focused on suffering, such as self-harm, pornography, and sexual assault, and some that are a bit more hopeful, like family, freedom in Christ, and self-esteem. This performance aims to shine a bit of light into the darkness. It’s goal is to make people think, remind them they are not alone, and point them back to God's love, whether they are currently feeling particularly hopeful or in the midst of suffering.

 

Participants: REACH Drama Ministry members: Ty Michonski, Anna Lewis, Justin Waters, Grace Juhlin, Gwendolin Bellamy, Elaina Francisco

*10–11 a.m.


KOSC 109

Fowler Auditorium

 

 

Universities of Oxford Research Presentations

 

Two Gordon students will present the results of their research undertaken at Oxford University:

Paul San Sung Park’s research sought to examine whether competition, a central component of Theistic Evolution, was compatible with the Bible. As those in the world but not of it, Christians find themselves in a never-ending cycle of competition and it is imperative for Christian to have a working understanding of the violent nature of competition and see how that aligns with our allegiance to the Prince of Peace.

 

Hannah Park’s psychology research consisted of comparing the mental health differences between religious and nonreligious individuals. Both religious and nonreligious individuals differ in their levels of mental health - and the difference mostly correlates with the strength of their belief. This mini-meta-analysis seeks to show that belief in God (and belief in other things like science, technology, etc.) provides individuals with stronger mental health levels.

 

Participants: Paul San Sung Park, Hannah Park

*11 a.m.–12 p.m.


Coy Pond, Walking Trail

 

Restore Creation

Hope is visibly represented through the life and growth of plants, animals and thriving ecosystems. Although all species suffer because of the brokenness of sin in the world, we can still find hope and gratitude in the strength and resilience of budding plants and new life. We will also be asking students to observe where plants might be suffering due to storms, pollution, overgrowth, etc. and where they see hope in the budding of new plants. Participants will be led on a meditative walk around Coy Pond with stops to reflect on community, solitude, nature, and hope. They will be assisted in reflection by the reading of relevant quotes and selected writings and by participating in a few guided activities.

 

Participants: Mark Stowell, La Vida staff

*11 a.m.–12 p.m.

 

KOSC 101
Chairman’s Room

 

Linguistics Senior Seminar: Writing Systems

Throughout the semester, the Linguistics Senior Seminar has taken a trip around the world and through time by analyzing various writing systems. They have been able to see a glimpse of various cultures and begin the journey of understanding the purpose for writing systems. Hope looks different in different cultures, and this presentation will share transcriptions of various scripts that offer hope to the people in that particular culture, whether it is a Bible verse, a verse from the Koran, or even a poem. Writing offers hope to many and allows people to capture present thoughts and see beyond the moment in which they find themselves.

 

Participants: Quick Yun, Nicole Barber, Rebecca Howland, Abigail Colpitts, Abbey Mitchell, Jenna Treichler, Gabriella Uribazo, Jessica Finnegan, Chanju Lee, Jordan Schan, Kristopher Lowengrub, Yejee Lee, Theresa Lucier, Mikala Silvestri, Dr. Graeme Bird

*11 a.m.–12 p.m.

 

Barrington 138
Cinema Room

 

 

Poesía y vida: el llanto del que espera

Poetry and life: the cry of the hopeful

The topic of "hope in suffering" is one that appeals greatly to the creative mind. Poetry is a place where the tension between pain and expectation may be explored in all its beauty and terror. The topics may be varied (love, toil, faith, play) but the pull of both emotions (pain and hope) is latent in each and every aspect of life. This will be a poetry reading event. Every year, SPN313: Creative Writing in Spanish dedicates a block to reading and researching the Symposium topic chosen for the spring. Students write their own pieces of poetry which are part of one of their assignments for the class. During this poetry reading event, students share their original poetry in Spanish and English for the rest of the community.

 

Participants: Amelia Bowser, Hannah Fleth, Spencer Hess, Delilah Lugo Galland, Abbey Mitchell, Alyssa Penner, Arielle Stanberry, Sophia Tall, Dr. Pilar Pérez Serrano

*12–1 p.m.


KOSC 109
Fowler Auditorium

 

Cryptocurrencies – Truths and Myths

The Investment Analysis class will present on the topic of cryptocurrencies – a little regulated and often misunderstood area of finance. The presentation will address various issues related to the market for cryptocurrencies, their investors, their underlying technologies, related concerns, and regulatory responses to this new asset class.

 

Participants: Michelle Buettner, Heidi Cookson, Jay Gallipo, Owen Haworth, Mackenzie Hinds, Erik Holvik, Ryan Jarosz, Tyler Modzeleski, Steven Vampatella

*12–1 p.m.


Jenks 237

 

Storytelling

Public Story Telling is a class that teaches students the skills needed to tell stories in a way fit for radio. Last year's class wrote and recorded many personal stories--mostly true, sometimes fictional--that deal with the normal things in the lives of many people, students and non-students alike. Because of the nature of these stories, they deal with both the good and the bad of human experience. Each piece is a little slice of life, beautifully packed up and presented in an audio file that will delight ears everywhere. This symposium, like the class itself, helps people interact with the themes of hope and suffering on a personal level. Not only does it feature stories of high and low points in students’ lives, but it also allows students to tell them for themselves. Further, this course gives students the ability to make these stories accessible, interesting, and maybe even a little funny.

 

Previous events/recordings are here:

 

Participants: Ryan Pavelski, Bradley Boutcher, Nadia Blayer, Heidi Thomas, Tohko Nohara, Damon Kilgore, Gwendolin Bellamy, Abigail Erdelatz, Jon Brubaker.

*1–2:30 p.m.
AND
9–10:30 a.m.



Barrington 138
Cinema Room

 

White Rabbit, Red Rabbit

Through the medium of theater, playwright Nassim Soleimanpour hopes to send his voice and influence traveling around the world. His play White Rabbit, Red Rabbit addresses how people are fooled into obtaining a false sense of hope through multiple actions and objects.  The actor or actress performing the show has NEVER read the script or doesn't know what will happen. As soon as they step on stage, he or she performs and reads whatever appears in the script. Theatre provides an in-the-moment experience, where people’s guards are down and they are fully exposed to new ideas. This performance and session of audience feedback seeks to inspire healthy conversation and development as Christians through Soleimanpour’s work. Please do not look up the play before hand; it will ruin the experience. 

 

Participants: Audrey Wilcox, Edward Lindem, Jessica Richmond, Drew Cleveland

*1–2 p.m.

 

KOSC 127

Greco-Roman Poetry and Modern Rap

Modern rap and poetry share many common themes: suffering, love, and the brokenness of humanity. A senior research paper will examine the similarities between Homer, Virgil, Eminem, Kendrick Lamar, and others. Despite the apparently vast differences between these four personages, the presentation will assert that humanity does not really ever change, even if the mode of expression does.

 

Participants: Chris Perednia, Dr. Graeme Bird

*1–2 p.m.


KOSC 124

After Modesty Culture: Living into the Hope of Our Redeemed Bodies

Senior Eliza Stiles will be presenting the research from her Christian Ministries honors thesis on modesty culture. The core theological foundation of the modesty narrative is rooted in human sinfulness, with modesty advocates having tended toward a view of the human body only as post-fall instead of also striving toward our embodied full redemption. Because of the work of Christ, we are en route as the new creation which has significant implications for how we live our lives as embodied men and women now. A correctly reconstructed understanding of embodiment will transform the conversation from one of modesty and concealing our bodies to one of hope – revealing our need for healing our relationships with our own bodies and the bodies of others.

 

Participants: Eliza Stiles

*2–3 p.m.


KOSC 101
Chairman’s Room

 

The Metal in the Mold: Matthew Parker and the Recasting of England’s Ecclesiastical Past

Senior history major Joshua Rawleigh’s will present his thesis on the English Reformation figure Matthew Parker and his creation of what we now know as the Anglican Church. A major part of Parker's argument was that the English church had a long history of reform figures who were persecuted for their beliefs, stretching from the Anglo-Saxon era to the Reformation. In doing so, Parker demonstrates the long tradition of suffering in the Church and the hope of unity and redemption emerging from that suffering. The presentation will include a 30-40 minute presentation followed by faculty and audience questions.

 

Participants: Joshua Rawleigh

*2–3 p.m.


KOSC 127

Poetry for America: Hope for Our Nation

Our Nation has undergone a series of tragedies in last couple of decades. We have seen the horrible ways in which people treat other people, based of unfair biases according to race, gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. People have suffered from the hatred of others, and it has become easy to assume a grim outlook. However, there is healing to be had in the form of art. Poetry has become an outlet for many of those oppressed to express their sorrow, but also a way in which we can all connect to one another; a way in which the kindness of mankind, which is often called into question in tragedy, may triumph over hatred. We offer up poetry as a source of hope in the suffering of many in our nation.

 

Participants: ENG 348 students

*2–3 p.m.

KOSC 109
Fowler Auditorium

JAF Post Debate Discussion

Join us for a post-debate discussion of the 14th annual JAF debate on the resolution: “The American ideals of ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness’ are compatible with a biblical worldview.” Hear from the JAF participants about their debate experience, and get a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the JAF debate process in this Q&A discussion of the topic and arguments.

 

Participants: Rachel Edney, Levi Bushnell, Hannah Andres, Abigail Scott, Julianne McKay, Neema Kamau, Josh Grambow, Wesley Tenney, Micah Freer, Meredith Free, Jordan Bellamy, Jasmine Ye, Taylor-Marie Funchion, Deborah Sullivan 

*4:30–5:30 p.m.

Keynote Lecture

KOSC
MacDonald Auditorium

KEYNOTE: “Signposts from a Suffering World” 

N.T. Wright, Professor of New Testament at the University of St. Andrews, will give the keynote address for Symposium.