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Summer Online Courses

Each online course is easily transferable (particularly among Christian colleges). If you choose to enroll at Gordon, these options fulfill a Core Curriculum requirement, giving you a jump on credits before you enroll. 

ART 152 American Art History as Cultural Encounter
Credits: 4
Instructor:  
Schedule: May 16–June 25 (Online Asynchronous)
Investigates conversation between many cultures and styles that have taken American art from its emergence in the Americas about five thousand years ago, to its position in the European art world during colonial and post-colonial times, to final recognition of America as a modern global art leader.

ART152 Syllabus

BCM 103 Introduction to New Testament
Credits: 4
Instructor: 
Schedule: May 16–June 18; MR 7–8 p.m. (Online Synchronous)
Examines history and teachings of New Testament in political, social and religious contexts. Highlights important theological themes such as sin, grace, justification by faith, Kingdom of God.

BCM103 Syllabus

ENG 140A Core Seminar in Literature: Climate Fictions
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: May 16–June 25 (Online Asynchronous)
Climate fiction (or “cli-fi”) is a growing genre of literature that imagines the present and future impacts of climate change on the earth and its inhabitants. Many (but not all) works of climate fiction grow out of the wider genres of science fiction and speculative fiction, which also consider alternate worlds and narrate possible futures for humanity. In this course, we will read works of fiction and scientific writing that engage with climate change in various ways, seeking to understand the relationship between human culture and the earth’s climate. As we examine this diverse, interdisciplinary group of texts, we will consider the relationships between scientific and literary communities, appreciate the creativity and imagination involved in science, and reflect on literature’s ability to critique and assess the role of science in culture. In this course, our central questions will be: How can literature represent climate change (something so gradual, and yet so huge, that can feel like it is beyond our ability to understand or respond to it)? Can literature shape our conceptions of the earth and our role in caring for it? How are writers from diverse cultures narrating their experience of climate change?

ENG140A Syllabus

ENG 140B Core Seminar in Literature: Magical Realism
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: May 16–June 25 (Online Asynchronous)
Magical realism is a global genre of fiction that uses experimental narrative techniques to tell stories in striking and unsettling ways. According to critic Roger Holland, magical realist texts “re-imagin[e] ‘reality’ in ways that challenge readers to deconstruct both text and the contexts in which they live. A ‘book’ classified as magic realism tells its stories from the perspective of people who live in our world and experience a different reality from the one we call reality.” In magical realism, the supernatural becomes an unremarkable, unquestioned part of reality, while aspects of ordinary life are rendered strange and extraordinary. We will read novels and short stories from different cultural contexts–South America, North America, South Asia–to compare the ways these writers use magical realist techniques and the effects they have for us as part of their global audience.

ENG140B Syllabus

HIS 121 Historical Perspectives (Christianity and Western Civilizations)
Credits: 4
Instructor:  
Schedule: May 16–June 11 (Online Asynchronous)
Examines culture-building, development and change, and interaction of diverse peoples across a broad swath of history. Explores Christianity from its Middle Eastern roots through Renaissance/Reformation to global cultures of the contemporary world in political, technological, social and cultural contexts. Investigates Christian traditions, missionary endeavors, reform movements and relationships between adherents of different world religions. Introduces critical evaluation of historical evidence. Does not count toward history major.

HIS121 Syllabus

LAT 101S Beginning Latin I
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: May 16–June 25 (Online Asynchronous)
Introduction to classical Latin language and aspects of Roman culture and history. Covers fundamentals of grammar, morphology and syntax, along with readings from Latin prose literature (e.g., Caesar, Sallust, Cicero and Livy). Emphasis on developing facility in reading Latin texts including reading aloud.

LAT101/102 Syllabus

LAT 102S Beginning Latin II
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: July 5–Aug 13 (Online Asynchronous)
Introduction to classical Latin language and aspects of Roman culture and history. Covers fundamentals of grammar, morphology and syntax, along with readings from Latin prose literature (e.g., Caesar, Sallust, Cicero and Livy). Emphasis on developing facility in reading Latin texts including reading aloud. Prerequisite: LAT 101

LAT101/102 Syllabus

PHI 118 The Examined Life (Introduction to Philosophy)
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: May 16–June 25 (Online Asynchronous)
Introduces students to important historical and thematic issues about what it means to be human: Who are we? What is our place in the cosmos and how do we relate to the natural world around us? What does it mean to find an object or work of art beautiful? What does it mean to live well as opposed to just living? What is the best way to live well together as a society of persons? How can we know what is true? And how, given that we are made in God’s image, are we to understand our relationship to God?

PHI118 Syllabus

POL 104 American National Politics
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: July 5–Aug 13 (Online Asynchronous)
Critically examines basic commitments, institutions and processes of American politics; engages contemporary political debate; focuses on Constitution, political culture, interest groups, parties, Congress, Presidency and Supreme Court.

POL104 Syllabus

PSY180 Person in Psychological Context
Credits: 4
Instructor:
Schedule: May 16–June 11 (Online Asynchronous)

Explores psychological perspectives on the nature of persons in cross-cultural context. Focuses on research and theory, and introduces the discipline of psychology. Topics addressed include learning, development, social behavior, physiology, personality, memory, emotion, thinking, and diagnosis and treatment of disorders.

PSY180 Syllabus

 

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