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Content Area Courses

Featured Content Area Courses
Need PDPs? Gordon's Graduate Education program offers courses that provide three graduate credits and 67.5 Professional Development Points.

You can register for an upcoming course here. Please register at least one week before the start date of a course.


HIS673 Selected Topics: History of the American Presidency 1933-2008 (3)

This course analyzes the organization, behavior, and impact of the American presidency on American politics, policy, and culture.  Attention is given to historical developments in the American presidency since 1933.  The course will examine the evolutionary development of the presidency as an institution, the structural constraints and demands on presidents, and the increasing importance of unilateral executive powers.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FALL 2018

ART620 Photography (3)
In this course, we will consider basic concepts of composition, exposure, and shooting technique. Introduces fundamentals of cameras, lighting, composition, basics of processing and printing black and white film and use of photography as medium of communication and artistic expression.
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

BIO601 The Science of Forensics (3)
Focuses on biological and chemical principles and processes that aid in solving crimes. Identifies chemical clues and signatures, DNA fingerprinting, decomposition and decomposer life cycles related to timing and location of crimes. Explores the use of science in the service of justice for all.
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

BIO635 Environmental Science (3)
This course will focus on the broad range of science concerning the environment. Topics will be selected that are relevant to teaching and that will provide the necessary background to understand science and the environment for primary and secondary education. The focus will be conservation biology and the biology of environmental science. 
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

BIO641 Biochemistry (3)
Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. 
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students. 
$25 lab fee.

BIO601 The Science of Forensics (3)
Focuses on biological and chemical principles and processes that aid in solving crimes. Identifies chemical clues and signatures, DNA fingerprinting, decomposition and decomposer life cycles related to timing and location of crimes.  Explores the use of science in the service of justice for all.
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

CHE641 Biochemistry (3)
Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. 
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students. 
$25 lab fee.

CHE673 Selected Topics in Chemistry: Exploring Principles of Chemistry (3)
Explore concrete, real-world experiences to provide students the opportunity to deepen understanding of concepts associated with motion, matter, and energy. Students will look at the periodic table, elements, compounds and mixtures, changes of state, specific heat, properties of water and air, and differentiate between physical changes and chemical changes. Practical application of chemistry and physical science concepts to life and the environment will be made.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentative, and Alternative Forms of Communication (1)
This course reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Throughout the course, participants have the opportunity to observe and identify various ways to help their students access curriculum using these techniques. Students will also build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom.
This is a Self-guided Online Course.
September–December 2018

ENG604 Advanced Grammar for Writing (3)
Studies and analyzes grammar systems and syntax of English language. Includes the roles of grammar in the construction of written style and pedagogical implications in schools.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG644 The Ancient Greek World (3)
Explores the worlds of Hesiod and Homer, Aeschylus and Pericles, Alexander the Great and Paul the Apostle. Specific topics will be arranged in consultation with students' academic and teaching interests. 
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG650 History of Renaissance and Reformation (3)
From the roots of the Reformation in Late Medieval/Renaissance Europe, we will begin our exploration of Martin Luther's angst, his "95 Theses" and subsequent writings. We will then consider expression reforms in the first three generations of the Reformation, including the views of leading figures such as Zwingli, Calvin, and those in the English Reformation. We will consider both the "magisterial" and "radical" branches of the Reformation, as well as the Catholic "Counter-Reformation". Particular topics will vary depending on student interest.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS610 Principles of Geography (3)
Instructs students to think geographically about the world. Covers historical development, terminology and major themes of geography; current geographical issues in world's regions. Special emphasis placed on the skill of teaching geography and geography's role in education.
Tuesdays: August 29–December 20, 4:30–6:30 p.m.

HIS614 History of Massachusetts (3)
Covers the history of Massachusetts with emphasis on the colonial era through the American Civil War, including the rise of world-famous leather and textile industries.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS644 The Ancient Greek World (3)
Explores the worlds of Hesiod and Homer, Aeschylus and Pericles, Alexander the Great and Paul the Apostle. Specific topics will be arranged in consultation with students' academic and teaching interests. 
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS650 History of Renaissance and Reformation (3)
From the roots of the Reformation in Late Medieval/Renaissance Europe, we will begin our exploration of Martin Luther's angst, his "95 Theses" and subsequent writings. We will then consider expression reforms in the first three generations of the Reformation, including the views of leading figures such as Zwingli, Calvin, and those in the English Reformation. We will consider both the "magisterial" and "radical" branches of the Reformation, as well as the Catholic "Counter-Reformation". Particular topics will vary depending on student interest.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS672 U.S. Constitution (3)
Examines the background, foundations, drafting, implementation, and subsequent history of the U.S. Constitution. Core texts include the Constitution itself and America's Constitution: A Biography by Yale Law Professor Akhil Reed Amar. This course examines major sections of the Constitution separately and considers how it can be incorporated into individual classroom settings.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: September 18–December 4; 6–9 p.m.

MAT640 The Mathematics of Science (3)
Examines connections between and integration of mathematics and science and how to make sense of the world through this lens. Analysis of what math is needed for different secondary science classes. Determines scientific applications of major mathematical concepts.
 

WINTER 2018

ART663 Selected Topics: Ceramics (3)
Create stoneware functional pieces on pottery wheels in addition to crafting unique hand-built pieces (pinch pots, coil pots, slab pieces). Finish pieces from a selection of over 25 high fire glazes. Small classes focus on individualized attention. All clay and materials are provided. Lab fee due at the end of the session to the professor is a firing charge of $4.75/lb. of finished, glazed pots.
Thursdays: January 4–March 1; 6–9 p.m.
No class February 22

BIO625 Nutrition (3)
Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Mondays: Beginning January 29th 6–9 p.m.

BIO673 Selected Topics in Biology: Cancer Biology (3)
Students will delve into the history of cancer as one of medicine's greatest challenges. Twenty-four significant milestones in the understanding of cancer will be explored by thoroughly reading and discussing key papers for most of these milestones. Various methods for encouraging participation and discussion will be employed.
Tuesdays: January 23–May 8; 6–7:30 p.m.
No class February 20

CHE673 Selected Topics: Green Chemistry (3)
Green chemistry, also known as sustainable chemistry, is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, and use.
Starts week of January 22nd. Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.
$25 Lab fee.

EDU655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school. In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings. The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Online course

ENG638 General Linguistics (3)
Mondays: January 8–March 26; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class January 15 and February 19.

ENG635 Shakespeare, Active in Class & History (3) 
The reading and performance of Shakespeare have been part of the English classroom canon in both high school and college for many years. This course addresses both the historical context of Shakespeare’s plays and the themes within the plays. Strategies to make the reading and performance of Shakespeare’s plays are examined.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG673 Selected Topics: Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Developing Writers encourages teachers and learners at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom. The course will (1) learn practical writing strategies; (2) increase awareness of oneself as a writer and boost confidence and skill; (3) learn more about the experiences and development of certain successful authors, and use suggestions for reflective writing; and (4) compile a portfolio of written work. The course offers an opportunity to write and share your writing. It also will give a chance to offer honest and enthusiastic help to others. The course offers flexibility in that it can accommodate the writing interests and goals of each student—whether informational/academic/technical writing or creative fiction or nonfiction. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates the use of literature within writing. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG643 The History and Literature of the Ancient Greeks (3)
Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG650 History of Renaissance and Reformation (3)
From the roots of the Reformation in Late Medieval/Renaissance Europe, we will begin our exploration of Martin Luther's angst, his "95 Theses" and subsequent writings. We will then consider expression reforms in the first three generations of the Reformation, including the views of leading figures such as Zwingli, Calvin, and those in the English Reformation. We will consider both the "magisterial" and "radical" branches of the Reformation, as well as the Catholic "Counter-Reformation". Particular topics will vary depending on student interest.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FRE639 French Linguistics, Phonetics and Advanced Grammar (3)
What you need to know. Why do they do that? A study of the linguistic structure of French: looking at how the language is put together, how pronunciation and grammar work together and why the French say it "that way". How do they do that? An analysis of the phonetics and the pronunciation of French, so important to French speakers, which will furnish an understanding of the sound system and it's relevance to the message. What tools do they use? An inquiry into the finer points of French grammar and syntax that have eluded many French speakers. Student reports and interpretation will be required. Some attention will be given to adapting some items to the public school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FRE675 Le Roman initiatique dans la Francophonie: Coming of Age Novels in the Literature of the French-Speaking World (3)
A study of children and childhood as they grow to become part of the French-speaking world. The trio of culture, identity and crisis will be a central theme as we investigate readings from France, Africa, Haiti, Guadeloupe, the Maghreb, and Canada. Reading, discussion, interpretation and "explication de textewill be required. Attention will be given to adapting readings to a secondary school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS643 The History and Literature of the Ancient Greeks (3)
Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS644 The Ancient Greek World (3)
Explores the worlds of Hesiod and Homer, Aeschylus and Pericles, Alexander the Great and Paul the Apostle. Specific topics will be arranged in consultation with students' academic and teaching interests. 
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS650 History of Renaissance and Reformation (3)
From the roots of the Reformation in Late Medieval/Renaissance Europe, we will begin our exploration of Martin Luther's angst, his "95 Theses" and subsequent writings. We will then consider expression reforms in the first three generations of the Reformation, including the views of leading figures such as Zwingli, Calvin, and those in the English Reformation. We will consider both the "magisterial" and "radical" branches of the Reformation, as well as the Catholic "Counter-Reformation". Particular topics will vary depending on student interest.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

HIS655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3) Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

MAT627 Investigating Mathematical Concepts (3)
Tuesdays: January 2–March 27; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class February 20

MAT637 Number Theory (3)
Number Theory, one of the oldest parts of mathematics, is devoted to a study of the set of positive whole numbers 1,2,3,4,5,6... often referred to as counting numbers or natural numbers. In particular, this course will develop the tools necessary to discover the patterns and relationships that exist within various subsets of the natural numbers. Topics will include divisibility, Pythagorean triples, congruences, prime numbers, Mersenne primes, perfect numbers, Euler's phi function, primality testing, and other selected topics as time permits.
This course will begin the week of January 29th.

MAT673 Number Sense (3)
This course will address the progression of number sense concepts from Kindergarten through Grade 8 as they relate to and support instruction in middle school and high school settings. Emphasis will be on deepening teachers’ understanding of arithmetic operations, teaching concepts vs. procedures, and incorporating the Standards for Mathematical Practice.
Weekends: January 5–6; January 19–20; February 2–3; March 2–3
Fridays 6–9 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

SPRING 2018

ART620 Photography (3)
In this course, we will consider basic concepts of composition, exposure, and shooting technique. Introduces fundamentals of cameras, lighting, composition, basics of processing and printing black and white film and use of photography as a medium of communication and artistic expression
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

BIO637 Earth and Space (3)
Includes basic astronomy, meteorology, geology, and oceanography. Topics will range from plate tectonics to climate change to the history of the earth and the universe. Emphasis on activities, field trips, and laboratories for these topics.
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students. $25 lab fee.

BIO641 Biochemistry (3)
Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. 
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students. $25 lab fee.

CHE641 Biochemistry (3)
Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. 
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students. $25 lab fee.

ENG632 Literature for Adolescents (3)
In-depth examination of literature for young adults used thematically throughout middle school and secondary curricula. Draws on the experience of M.A.T. students to examine the cross-cultural implication of literature.
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

ENG673 Selected Topics: Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FRE677 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Knights in shining armor, damsels in distress, evil and treachery, saints and sinners, defense of the nation at all costs, giants and birdmen, courtroom in disarray, enchantment, swords and hangman's nooses, magic potions, ribald poems, love poems, invisibility rings, quest for the Holy Grail, a plague and the search for self. Today's problems are anticipated by the classics of French medieval literature. Student presentations as well as "explications de texte" will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in a secondary setting.
Hybrid course with 6 class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule to be determined by students and the professor.

FRE679 Immigration in Contemporary France: La France arabe (3)
Burqa politics, a changing demographic, Christianity vs, Islam, fast food halal vs. secular school lunch, church vs. state, cartoon racism, the immigration "sins" of the fathers visited upon the sons (of the modern second and third generation), a housing project lifestyle, unemployment and less-than-equal opportunity, rap with social commentary all told through the eyes of the literature of Islamic France. C'est ça, la France contemporaine.
Hybrid course with six class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule.

HIS647 The Ancient Roman World (3)
In this course, we will consider the entire sweep of Roman history, from the legendary founding myths of Aeneas and Romulus through the Republic, Empire, and the eventual "fall" in the West. We will read both primary and secondary sources, particularly with an eye towards using them in a teaching context. Specific topics in Roman history and culture to be arranged with students. The course could incorporate readings in Latin if desired by students.
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

HIS672 U.S. Constitution (3)
Examines the background, foundations, drafting, implementation, and subsequent history of the U.S. Constitution. Core texts include the Constitution itself and America's Constitution: A Biography by Yale Law Professor Akhil Reed Amar. This course examines major sections of the Constitution separately and considers how it can be incorporated into individual classroom settings.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

KIN620/PHY620/BIO620 Computational Biomechanics: Modeling of Musculoskeletal Systems (3)
Examines the application of advanced kinematic and kinetic analyses in the assessment of human motion. Concepts of data processing, three-dimensional analysis, mechanical modeling and energy and power analysis applied in sport and rehabilitation contexts. Special emphasis on analysis of locomotion.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: April 3–June 18; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class April 17.

MAT605 Mathematics and the Greeks (3)
Mondays, April 2–June 20; 5:30–9:15 p.m.
No class April 16 and May 28.

PHY624 Introduction to Astronomy (3)
The Universe is complex and as such the field of Astronomy interdisciplinary by its very nature. This course will provide an overview of the earth and moon in space, the Sun, and objects in the Solar System, objects beyond the solar system such as comets nebulae, galaxies, Black Holes, Nova, Gama Ray Bursts as well as theories on the origin, formation and, end of the universe.  This course will involve a combination of lecture, labs/field trips, writing and a discussion of published literature about current events related to the field.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

Summer 2018

ART620 Photography (3)
In this course, we will consider basic concepts of composition, exposure, and shooting technique. Introduces fundamentals of cameras, lighting, composition, basics of processing and printing black and white film and use of photography as a medium of communication and artistic expression
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

BIO630 Introduction to Marine Science (3)
The ocean is a complex environment, and as such, the field of Marine Science is interdisciplinary by its very nature. This course will provide an overview of the four main disciplines of oceanography: geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography in the classroom and lab, out in the field, and out on the water. 
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

BIO635 Environmental Science (3)
This course will focus on the broad range of science concerning the environment. Topics will be selected that are relevant to teaching and that will provide the necessary background to understand science and the environment for primary and secondary education. The focus will be conservation biology and the biology of environmental science. 
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

CHE673 Selected Topics: Green Chemistry (3)
Green chemistry, also known as sustainable chemistry, is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, and use.
$25 Lab fee.

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentative, and Alternative Forms of Communication (1)
This course reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Throughout the course, participants have the opportunity to observe and identify various ways to help their students access curriculum using these techniques. Students will also build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom.
This is a Self-guided Online Course.
July–August 2018

EDU655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school. In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings. The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Online course

EDU764 Raising Self-Awareness: Social Emotional Teaching Practices That Impact Student Learning (1)
The course will provide teachers with the framework from which an abbreviated Educator Plan can be developed based on self-assessment of how teachers set goals with outcome expectations to address social-emotional learning competencies in the context of (their) classroom learning environments.  Topics for self-assessment will be aligned with attaining the competencies developed by the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL) and adopted by the State of Massachusetts Curriculum and Instruction for Social and Emotional Learning.
This is an online course.

EDU776 Reading Specialist as Professional Writer: Explore Publication and Current Controversies (3)
Students will research, discuss, synthesize, analyze and write about writing. This is a dual purpose course. One purpose is to prepare reading specialists to write for and interpret peer-reviewed journals in their field. The other purpose is to research and analyze the deep, important, and sometimes controversial current issues in the field of writing. The proposed outcome of this course is to move reading specialists, who often have little background in writing, into an informed position to enable them to be professional leaders in the domain of writing.
Weekends: July 20–21, August 17–18, October 19–20, December 14–15
Fridays 6–9 p.m., Saturdays 8 a.m.–3 p.m.
Please note—this course spans both the Summer and Fall sessions.

EDU777 Professional Development for the Content Specialist (3)
Explores varied professional development models, analyzes and applies models and synthesizes a professional development plan for a school that covers a half year of implementation for English Language Arts.
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

ENG604 Advanced Grammar for Writing (3)
Studies and analyzes grammar systems and syntax of English language. Includes the roles of grammar in the construction of written style and pedagogical implications in schools.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG632 Literature for Adolescents (3)
In-depth examination of literature for young adults used thematically throughout middle school and secondary curricula. Draws on the experience of M.Ed. students to examine cross-cultural implications of literature.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG635 Shakespeare Active in Class and History (3)
The reading and performance of Shakespeare have been part of the English classroom canon in both high school and college for many years. This course addresses both the historical context of Shakespeare’s plays and the themes within the plays. Strategies to make the reading and performance of Shakespeare’s plays are examined.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Developing Writers encourages teachers and learners at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom. The course will (1) learn practical writing strategies; (2) increase awareness of oneself as a writer and boost confidence and skill; (3) learn more about the experiences and development of certain successful authors, and use suggestions for reflective writing; and (4) compile a portfolio of written work. The course offers an opportunity to write and share your writing. It also will give a chance to offer honest and enthusiastic help to others. The course offers flexibility in that it can accommodate the writing interests and goals of each student—whether informational/academic/technical writing or creative fiction or nonfiction. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates the use of literature within writing. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG676 Literary Analysis (3)
Literary analysis is the method by which we examine and understand the literature we read. Critical theory is the variety of lenses we bring to that analysis. Not surprisingly, there are multiple lenses through which scholars have viewed literature. Many of these theories reflect the social and philosophical issues of the period in which they were developed. At the same time, they raise universal questions about life and its meaning.  This course will allow you to understand how these different theories examine literature, and how they are similar and different from each other.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG677 Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FRE639 French Linguistics, Phonetics and Advanced Grammar (3)
What you need to know. Why do they do that? A study of the linguistic structure of French: looking at how the language is put together, how pronunciation and grammar work together and why the French say it "that way". How do they do that? An analysis of the phonetics and the pronunciation of French, so important to French speakers, which will furnish an understanding of the sound system and it's relevance to the message. What tools do they use? An inquiry into the finer points of French grammar and syntax that have eluded many French speakers. Student reports and interpretation will be required. Some attention will be given to adapting some items to the public school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. 

FRE673 Selected Topics: More Villians, Fewer Heroes in French Fiction (3)
Women abducted, loathsome villains, deceitful heirs, hateful sloths and venomous personalities edge their way into a literature whose steadfast heroes and heroines stand above and prevail through all that is right! Reading and discussion of acclaimed French novels, disturbing supermarket fiction, unsettling short stories and valiant comic book characters. Student reports as well as study of “explications de texte” will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in the public school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule.

HIS655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school. In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings. The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Online course

HIS673 Selected Topics: History of the American Presidency 1933-2008 (3)
This course analyzes the organization, behavior, and impact of the American presidency on American politics, policy, and culture.  Attention is given to historical developments in the American presidency since 1933.  The course will examine the evolutionary development of the presidency as an institution, the structural constraints and demands on presidents, and the increasing importance of unilateral executive powers.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

LAT673 Selected Topics: Classical Latin (3)
Latin is foundational to the flow of Western history and thought, and thus provides an excellent background for history and English teachers, even if their teaching areas are more modern. The course will cover vocabulary, grammar, and culture of the ancient Romans. No prior knowledge of Latin is required, though knowledge of Romance languages (Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, French, Italian, etc.) is helpful. The course is largely asynchronous on Blackboard, meaning a student can work through the chapters at his or her own pace, though the instructor provides an outline of when chapters should be completed. The only hard deadlines are the midterm and final exams. The flexibility of this system can allow for travel and work plans within reason.
Online course

MAT623 Advanced Calculus (3)
Advanced Calculus is the rigorous study of the concepts from Calculus. The goal of this course is to prove the common theorems used in calculus, and beyond. The course starts with a study of the real number line and covers sequences, series, continuity, limits, derivatives, and integrals (if time) from a rigorous and proof-centered point of view.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

MAT673 Introduction to Euclidean Geometry (3) 
This course investigates a mathematical system attributed to Euclid, the Alexandrian Greek mathematician.  This class will explore a way of thinking how a small set of intuitively appealing axioms can be used to deduce many other propositions (theorems).
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

PHY628 Physics and Engineering of Materials (3)
This course explores how the history of a material (its processing) influences its structure, and thus determines its properties and performance. The earliest humans lived in the Stone Age, where people used only natural materials such as stone, clay, skins, and wood. Later, people discovered copper and how to harden it, leading to the Bronze Age about 3000 BC. The use of iron and then steel, gave mankind an even stronger and harder material, with the Iron Age beginning about 1200 BC. Inexpensive processes to produce steel were commercialized in the 1800s, enabling the Industrial Age and modern civilization as we know it. In the twentieth century, the development of solid-state electronics brought modern man into the Silicon Age.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.
$25 lab fee

PHY677 Optics (3)
This course will begin with a review of wave motion and basic electromagnetic theory then proceed on to propagation of light.  Geometric optics touching on interference and other wave-optics phenomena such as diffraction, polarization, and time-allowing, Fourier optics will be examined. Laser-based experiments will be explored.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.
$25 lab fee

SPN696 Elena Poniatowsk and Carlos Fuentes: Inquiries into Mexican History and Identity (3)
This course will delve into contemporary history and the concept of Mexican identity through the study of two of Mexico's most significant authors: Elena Poniatowsk and Carlos Fuentes. Students will analyze both the narrative and stylistic techniques within the context of the Latin American "boom". The students will study the importance of memory as the foundation of Mexico's future collective imagination.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

SPN697 Latin American Short Story: The Gigantic Tree's Sleeping Seed (3)
This course will familiarize students with the development of the Latin American short story from its origins in the XIX century until now. Students will analyze genre conventions, literary and theoretical movements, and the works of the most significant Latin American short story writers: Quiroga, Echeverría, Rulfo, Borges Poniatowska, Alegría, Cortázar, García Márquez, Ferré, and Allende among others. This course will contextualize and study the universal and mythical aspects of Latin American short story writing.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.