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Content Area Courses

Featured Content Area Courses
Need PDPs? Gordon's Graduate Education program offers courses that provide three graduate credits and 67.5 Professional Development Points.

You can register for an upcoming course here. Please register at least one week before the start date of a course.


FALL 2020

ART611 Introduction to Graphic Design (3)
Working in the Adobe Creative Suite, students will learn how to use modern design software to create logos, illustrations, and other graphics for both print and screen. Students will also survey the history of graphic design, learning both constant principles of design and gaining an understanding of current trends in the design community.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART625 Clay Sculpture (3)
Students will learn foundational methods of sculpting in clay, from simple solids to more complex, representational forms. Students will begin with basic techniques and work their way towards a large final project. Students will also be introduced to both historic and contemporary sculptors to inform their own work.
Lab fee.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentative & Alternative Communication (1)
Reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Observe and identify various ways to help students access curriculum using these techniques. Build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom.
Online

EDU655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)This course is an overview and study of the character of urban schools, many of which face significant challenges in our society. The study is based upon current research in the field and the real-life narratives of urban teachers, school leaders, students, and parents. We will examine areas of education and pedagogy, but also consider the significant role and impact of economics and urban poverty, culture and multiculturalism, race and racism, politics, the role of government and social ethics. The goal of the course is to raise awareness of the issues and challenges of urban schools as well as to consider and develop the possibilities for renewal and reform within these vital institutions in our American society and educational system.
Tuesdays, September 15–December 11, 6–9 p.m.

EDU764 Raising Self-Awareness: Social Emotional Teaching Practices That Impact Student Learning (1)
Proposes to advance the professional teacher’s self-assessment to meet standards that require an inherent ability to connect with students on a human/personal level and consequently demonstrate the ability to be receptive to the social, emotional, and academic engagement of all children (Keystone Center, 2014). Begins a five-step cycle to meet the five core competencies required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. Self-awareness, the first of the competencies, is defined as the ability to accurately recognize one’s emotions, thoughts, and their influences on behavior. Includes assessing one’s strengths and limitations and possessing a well-grounded sense of confidence and optimism.

Through a balanced approach, the course provides the professional educator with an overview of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) as a cultural competency, the Massachusetts Core Competencies of SEL, with the opportunity to develop an Educator Plan appropriate for their level of evaluation aligned with the state standards. Under the umbrellas of social cognitive theory, and self-regulated learning theory, the course will provide theory-based instruction including measurement of teacher-efficacy, self-monitoring, and self- evaluation.
Online

FRE667 Les Animaux: De la fable aux écrits modernes (3)
Animals viewed by man in a variety of literary contexts from the middle ages to the modern world: fables, poetry, novels. Animals that outwit, animals that act out human endeavors, animals that represent historical aspects, animals that frighten. Through a reading of several novels we will see animals in a new light. Reading, discussions and activities and explications de texte. This is an active course of student participation and not a lecture series. This course is designed to increase students' language skills. 
Online synchronous course.

FRE669 La Littérature pour les Jeunes (3)
Taking samples of iconic moments throughout French literature, we will see which authors and works are in the canon for younger learners in French schools and also review those works which French young people read for personal enjoyment and see how the level of language and the cultural aspects can fit into the common sequence of our French classes via vocabulary, grammar and cultural understanding. Attention to preparing students for the reading through the cultural, linguistic and vocabulary sides; while-reading and post-reading activities which can help involve students in a text and edit the task, not the text.   Finally, students will move beyond the text to view how the text can help them to understand the cultural and linguistic societies which they are studying. We will discuss the readings and engage in new learning activities as a method of studying literature.  This course is designed to increase student's language skills. Students will consult with professor to arrange class times. Group work will take place via Zoom where classmates can meet on a flexible basis. A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule.
Online synchronous course.

HIS614 The History of Massachusetts: 16201865 (3)
Covers history of Massachusetts with emphasis on colonial era through American Civil War, including rise of world-famous Massachusetts leather and textile industries.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS615 The History of Puritan New England: 16201740 (3)
This course examines the political, religious, social, and economic history of Puritan New England and studies the region’s influence in the broader context of American history. Readings from the course will include literature from the time period. The course will consist of a lecture and discussion format with possible field trip to nearby historic sites. Historical events including the Great Migration, Pequot War, Antinomian controversy, King Philip’s War, Salem Witchcraft Trials, and the Great Awakening will be covered.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of urban schools, many of which face significant challenges in our society. The study is based upon current research in the field and the real-life narratives of urban teachers, school leaders, students, and parents. We will examine areas of education and pedagogy, but also consider the significant role and impact of economics and urban poverty, culture and multiculturalism, race and racism, politics, the role of government and social ethics. The goal of the course is to raise awareness of the issues and challenges of urban schools as well as to consider and develop the possibilities for renewal and reform within these vital institutions in our American society and educational system.
Tuesdays, September 15–December 11, 6–9 p.m.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3) 
Thursdays: September 17–December 13, 6–9 p.m.
No class Thursday, November 26​

SUMMER 2020

ART601 Experimental Drawing: Techniques in Mixed Media (3)
Advanced level drawing class moving beyond traditional boundaries to work in wet and dry media on two-dimensional surfaces. Explores the depth of creative process and the dialogue of various drawing traditions while enhancing technique and personal visual language.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART614 Painting in Mixed Media: Methods and Mediums (3)
Advanced level painting class exploring abstract and expressionist contemporary painting using a wide variety of media. This class welcomes experimental methods and the unique melding of media to push against traditional concepts of painting. Throughout the painting process, students will be in creative dialogue with modernist and current painters.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART620 Photography (3)
Introduces fundamentals of cameras, lighting, composition, basics of processing and printing black and white film, and use of photography as medium of communication and artistic expression.
Lab fee.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART678 Using Museums in the Classroom (3)
Exposes educators to educational programs and resources of science, art and history museums. Broadens teacher's awareness of what is available through cooperative interaction with museum education departments and their staff. Classes will visit a variety of the area's leading museums and participate in training workshops led by some of the Boston area's foremost museum educators.
Weekdays: July 6–10; 8 a.m.–4 p.m.

BIO601 The Science of Forensics (3) FULL
Focuses on biological and chemical principles and processes that aid in solving crimes. Identifies chemical clues and signatures, DNA fingerprinting, Decomposition and decomposer life cycles related to timing and location of crimes. Explores the use of science in the service of justice for all.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students. FULL

BIO613 Anatomy and Physiology (3)
Using a systems approach to the study of human anatomy and physiology, this course examines the structures, functions and homeostatic mechanisms of cells, tissues, and selected organ systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and special senses. Selected topics will be examined to allow for further study of content in applied contexts with emphases on health and disease. Laboratory activities will include opportunities for cadaver-based study as well as the study of other human tissues. 
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

BIO630 Introduction to Marine Science (3)
The ocean is a complex environment, and as such, the field of Marine Science is interdisciplinary by its very nature. This course will provide an overview of the four main disciplines of oceanography: geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography in the classroom and lab, out in the field, and out on the water. Lab fee.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

BIO635 Environmental Science (3)
This course will focus on the broad range of science concerning the environment. Topics will be selected that are relevant to teaching and that will provide the necessary background to understand science and the environment for primary and secondary education. The focus will be conservation biology and the biology of environmental science.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

CHE601 The Science of Forensics (3) FULL
Focuses on biological and chemical principles and processes that aid in solving crimes. Identifies chemical clues and signatures, DNA fingerprinting, Decomposition and decomposer life cycles related to timing and location of crimes. Explores the use of science in the service of justice for all.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students. FULL

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentive and Alternative Communication (1)
Reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Observe and identify various ways to help students access curriculum using these techniques. Build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom.
Online​ Asynchronous

EDU764 Raising Self-Awareness: Social Emotional Teaching Practices That Impact Student Learning (1)
Proposes to advance the professional teacher’s self-assessment to meet standards that require an inherent ability to connect with students on a human/personal level and consequently demonstrate the ability to be receptive to the social, emotional, and academic engagement of all children (Keystone Center, 2014). Begins a five-step cycle to meet the five core competencies required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. Self-awareness, the first of the competencies, is defined as the ability to accurately recognize one’s emotions, thoughts, and their influences on behavior. Includes assessing one’s strengths and limitations and possessing a well-grounded sense of confidence and optimism.

Through a balanced approach, the course provides the professional educator with an overview of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) as a cultural competency, the Massachusetts Core Competencies of SEL, with the opportunity to develop an Educator Plan appropriate for their level of evaluation aligned with the state standards. Under the umbrellas of social cognitive theory, and self-regulated learning theory, the course will provide theory-based instruction including measurement of teacher-efficacy, self-monitoring, and self- evaluation.
​Online​

ENG619 The Romantic Period in History and Literature (3)
This course examines the key historical events and literary works of the Romantic Period in both the United States and England. Students will consider the connection between historical events and the literature written at the same time. Authors include Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Wordsworth, Shelley and Austen.
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students.

ENG635 Shakespeare Active in Class and History (3)
The reading and performance of Shakespeare has been part of the English classroom canon in both high school and college for many years. This course addresses both the historical context of Shakespeare’s plays and the themes within the plays. Strategies to make the reading and performance of Shakespeare’s plays are examined.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG638 General Linguistics (3)
Linguistics is the study not just of languages, but of language itself. Examines different features common to all languages, such as phonetics and phonology, syntax, semantics and morphology.
Mondays and Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.–9:10 p.m. June 29, July 2, July 6, July 9, July 20, July 23, July 27 and July 30

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Encourages teachers at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates use of literature within writing.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG676 Literary Analysis (3)
Literary analysis is the method by which we examine and understand the literature we read. Critical theory is the variety of lenses we bring to that analysis. Not surprisingly, there are multiple lenses through which scholars have viewed literature. Many of these theories reflect the social and philosophical issues of the period in which they were developed. At the same time, they raise universal questions about life and its meaning. This course will allow you to understand how these different theories examine literature, and how they are similar and different from each other.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG677 Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about how to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

FRE661 La Francophonie (3)
Reading of literature in French from all over the world: Haiti, Guadeloupe, Sénégal, the Congo, Canada and Louisiana. Short stories, fables and novels. Tragic emigration, description of life in Muslim Africa, joy and happiness. We will discuss the readings, watch films and use explication de texte as a method of studying literature. This is an active course of student participation and not a lecture series. This course is designed to increase students' language skills.
Online synchronous course.

FRE664 Plus ça change: la linguistique, la phonétique and la syntaxe d’un français changeant (3)
La linguistique d’une langue vivante, we will explore the nature of a language as it is changing in our lifetime in semantics, syntax and phonetics. How has the language of young people evolved? What changes have been brought about by immigrants and speakers of French as a second language? What is the impact of the French spoken outside of France? How is syntax evolving? What vocabulary is disappearing? entering? changing? What sounds are disappearing and evolving? What is verlan and reverlan? How does the world order impact the language? Via what road is French becoming the premier language of the globe? This is an active course of student participation and not a lecture series. Reading, discussions and activities. This course is designed to increase students' language skills. A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. This course assumes complete knowledge of grammar, syntax and sound structure of French.
Online synchronous course.

FRE672 À table! The Importance of Food in French Culture (3)
From a variety of sources including literature, film, menus, reviews and recipes, we will investigate the central aspect of food and culinary arts in the life of France. The influence of food on expression, vocabulary, and other aspects of every-day life in France and beyond. We will study plot, characters and textual analysis. Planned structured sharing and assignments for speaking and writing. This is an active course of student participation and not a lecture series. Reading, discussions and activities and explications de texte. This course is designed to increase students' language skills. A regular class will meet via Zoom at a regular time. Students will consult with professor to arrange class times. Group work will take place via Zoom where nationwide classmates can meet on a flexible basis.
Online synchronous course.

HIS602 Math and Your Vote (3)
Inquiry-based exploration of the mathematics behind voting and decision procedures in the social sciences. Focuses on actual examples of how we make decisions and vote, from the presidency to town meeting, from how the electoral college is organized to gerrymandering. The level of mathematics should provide many opportunities to connect to interdisciplinary lesson-planning at the middle and high school levels.
Weekdays: June 29–July 2, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; additional time online

HIS616 The Maritime History of Massachusetts (3)
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the importance of maritime activities to the social, economic and military history of the United States from colonial times to the start of the American Civil War. Inherent in this narrative are the exploits of maritime explorers, fishermen, merchants, ship-owners, ship-builders, privateers, pirates, commercial sea captains and naval heroes. The story of America’s growth as a world-class, maritime power is an important theme in the development of the United States. It is hoped that this course will provide students with a contextual framework for understanding the significance of maritime activity in the economic evolution of the nation.​
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of urban schools, many of which face significant challenges in our society. The study is based upon current research in the field and the real-life narratives of urban teachers, school leaders, students, and parents. We will examine areas of education and pedagogy, but also consider the significant role and impact of economics and urban poverty, culture and multiculturalism, race and racism, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. The goal of the course is to raise awareness of the issues and challenges of urban schools as well as to consider and develop the possibilities for renewal and reform within these vital institutions in our American society and educational system.
Online course: Start date week of July 20

HIS667 Immigration in the USA through Historical Inquiry: The Ellis Island Experience (3)
The course provides an opportunity to use specific methods of historical inquiry to build content knowledge through studying the collection of oral history excerpts from the Ellis Island Oral History Collection, (which includes approximately 2,000 full interviews to choose from). Audio clips (with accompanying transcripts) have been specifically selected to be useful in middle and high school learning environments in lesson planning or integrated into a literacy/history curriculum. The required workload includes a virtual trip to Ellis Island (online) as part of the research and inquiry project. Expertise in historical inquiry is critical for strong pedagogical practice in learning environments and life. You are the student, conducting historical inquiries in order to be able to share these skills with future students.
Online Course 

HIS678 Using Museums in the Classroom (3) POSTPONED
Exposes educators to educational programs and resources of science, art and history museums. Broadens teacher's awareness of what is available through cooperative interaction with museum education departments and their staff. Classes will visit a variety of the area's leading museums and participate in training workshops led by some of the Boston area's foremost museum educators.
Weekdays: July 6–10; 8 a.m.–4 p.m.

MAT602 Math and Your Vote (3)
Inquiry-based exploration of the mathematics behind voting and decision procedures in the social sciences. Focuses on actual examples of how we make decisions and vote, from the presidency to town meeting, from how the electoral college is organized to gerrymandering. The level of mathematics should provide many opportunities to connect to interdisciplinary lesson-planning at the middle and high school levels.
Weekdays: June 29–July 2, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; additional time online

MAT627 Investigating Mathematical Concepts (3)
Explores ways to expand teacher’s knowledge of strategies used to teach mathematics. Topics include: number and operation, algebraic thinking, geometry, measurement, problem solving, justifying and reasoning.
Weekdays: June 29; 6–9 p.m. July 13–16 8 a.m.–4 p.m., July 17, 8 a.m.–1 p.m

SPN662 Historia, Cultura y Civilización de Hispanoamérica​ (3)
Explores the geography, history, fine arts, and socio-cultural demographics of Latin America countries.
Starting week of June 29. Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

SPN664 Hispanic Youth Literature (3)
This course will explore how to teach literature to students of different levels of linguistic abilities. We will explore three major facets of teaching texts. First, what kind of pre-reading activities are needed to prepare students for what they are about to read? Students need the cultural and linguistic context before they even begin to dive into the text. Strategies include: exploring the context through images and research, introducing vocabulary through images and activities where students develop skills to negotiate meaning, and, based on cultural and linguistic clues, begin to engage in psycho-linguistic guessing to form ideas of what they are about to read. Second, how can they engage in the text to confirm or deny what guesses they have formed? Third, how can they use the text to engage in an integrated performance activity? We will look at different texts and examples to explore these three major questions.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

SPN695 21 Century Latin American Cinema (3)
Examines films released between 2000 and 2012 that are written, directed and/or produced by Latin American filmmakers or set in Latin American spaces. Student will gain broader understanding of contemporary Latin America cinema, allowing the criticism of different meanings, symbols, styles, experiences and fostering emotional and rational responses. Conducted in Spanish.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

SPRING 2020

ART601 Experimental Drawing: Techniques in Mixed Media (3)
Advanced level drawing class moving beyond traditional boundaries to work in wet and dry media on two-dimensional surfaces. Explores the depth of creative process and the dialogue of various drawing traditions while enhancing technique and personal visual language.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART614 Painting in Mixed Media: Methods and Mediums (3)
Advanced level painting class exploring abstract and expressionist contemporary painting using a wide variety of media. This class welcomes experimental methods and the unique melding of media to push against traditional concepts of painting. Throughout the painting process, students will be in creative dialogue with modernist and current painters.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ART630 Ceramics (3)
Create stoneware functional pieces on pottery wheels in addition to crafting unique hand-built pieces (pinch pots, coil pots, slab pieces). Finish pieces from a selection of over 25 high fire glazes. Small classes focus on individualized attention. All clay and materials are provided. Lab fee due at end of session to the professor: firing charge of $4.75/lb of finished, glazed pots.
May 4–June 27

ART652 American Art History as Cultural Encounter (3)
Investigates conversation between many cultures and styles that have taken American art from its emergence in the Americas about five thousand years ago, to its position in the European art world during colonial and post-colonial times, to final recognition of America as a modern global art leader.
May 18–June 27
Online Asynchronous

BIO625 Nutrition (3)
Explores the fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions, and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

BIO630 Introduction to Marine Science (3)
The ocean is a complex environment, and as such, the field of Marine Science is interdisciplinary by its very nature. This course will provide an overview of the four main disciplines of oceanography: geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography in the classroom and lab, out in the field, and out on the water.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.
$25 lab fee

CHE670 Green Chemistry (3)
Green chemistry, also known as sustainable chemistry, is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, and use.
Starting week of April 21.
Lab fee

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentive and Alternative Communication (1)
Reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Observe and identify various ways to help students access curriculum using these techniques. Build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom.
Online​ Asynchronous

EDU764 Raising Self-Awareness: Social Emotional Teaching Practices That Impact Student Learning (1)
Proposes to advance the professional teacher’s self-assessment to meet standards that require an inherent ability to connect with students on a human/personal level and consequently demonstrate the ability to be receptive to the social, emotional, and academic engagement of all children (Keystone Center, 2014). Begins a five-step cycle to meet the five core competencies required by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education. Self-awareness, the first of the competencies, is defined as the ability to accurately recognize one’s emotions, thoughts, and their influences on behavior. Includes assessing one’s strengths and limitations and possessing a well-grounded sense of confidence and optimism.

Through a balanced approach, the course provides the professional educator with an overview of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) as a cultural competency, the Massachusetts Core Competencies of SEL, with the opportunity to develop an Educator Plan appropriate for their level of evaluation aligned with the state standards. Under the umbrellas of social cognitive theory, and self-regulated learning theory, the course will provide theory-based instruction including measurement of teacher-efficacy, self-monitoring, and self- evaluation.
Online​

ENG604 Advanced Grammar for Writing (3)
Studies and analyzes grammar systems and syntax of English language. Includes roles of grammar in construction of written style and pedagogical implications in schools.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG632 Literature for Adolescents (3)
In-depth examination of literature for young adults used thematically throughout middles school and secondary curricula. Draws on experience of students to examine cross-cultural implication of literature.
Held in a virtual classroom. Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

ENG676 Literary Analysis (3)
Literary analysis is the method by which we examine and understand the literature we read. Critical theory is the variety of lenses we bring to that analysis. Not surprisingly, there are multiple lenses through which scholars have viewed literature. Many of these theories reflect the social and philosophical issues of the period in which they were developed. At the same time they raise universal questions about life and its meaning. This course will allow you to understand how these different theories examine literature, and how they are similar and different from each other.
Held in a virtual classroom. Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

FRE674 Le Spectre de la Guerre: France at War (3)
In this course we will examine France at War through a variety of texts (poetic and narrative) showing the Napoleonic Wars, the Franco-Prussian War, the Two World Wars to the Algerian War and the War on Terror. We will explore plots of novels, details of description, reliability of narration. For further consideration, we will discuss the impact of war on the military as well as on the general population, the notions of patriotism and resistance, persistence of memory, and colonialism and genocide. This is an active course of student participation and not a lecture series. Reading, discussions and activities and explications de texte. This course is designed to increase students' language skills.
Online synchronous course.

FRE677 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Knights in shining armor, damsels in distress, evil and treachery, saints and sinners, defense of the nation at all costs, giants and birdmen, courtroom in disarray, enchantment, swords and hangman’s nooses, magic potions, ribald poems, love poems, invisibility rings, quest for the Holy Grail, a plague and the search for self. Today’s problems are anticipated by the classics of French medieval literature. Student presentations as well as “explications de texte” will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in a secondary school setting. This course is designed to increase students' language skills.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule.

HIS642 Britain in the Middle East: From Suez Purchase to Suez Crisis, 1875-1956 (3)
British imperialism and interests in the Middle East from late 19th century through the Suez Crisis of 1956. Includes British interests in Egypt and the Persian Gulf; First World War campaigns in Gallipoli, Iraq, and Palestine; British sponsorship of Zionism and travail under the Palestine Mandate; relations with Iraq and Jordan; World War II and the challenge of Holocaust refugees; Palestine civil war and the birth of the State of Israel; oil politics and revolution in Iran; and the Suez Crisis and its aftermath.
Wednesdays: April 15–June 17, 6–9 p.m. Additional time online as needed.
No class on April 22

HIS652 American Art History as Cultural Encounter (3)
Investigates conversation between many cultures and styles that have taken American art from its emergence in the Americas about five thousand years ago, to its position in the European art world during colonial and post-colonial times, to final recognition of America as a modern global art leader.
May 18–June 27
Online Asynchronous

HIS675 The Darwinian Revolution (3)
Examines advent and impact of Charles Darwin's evolution theory. Surveys life and earth sciences, religion and views on human origins before, during and after upheaval brought by Darwin's On the Origin of Species (1859). Includes recent debates on intelligent design and teaching of evolution.
Tuesdays: April 16–June 18, 6–9 p.m. Additional time online as needed.
No class on April 23

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Acquaints teachers with the development of mathematical concepts in the curriculum with the use of modeling with mathematics. A problem-centered approach is used to provide teachers and future teachers with the knowledge of mathematics necessary for effective instruction and intervention. The Massachusetts Curriculum Framework for Mathematics based on the Common Core State Standards assumes that modeling with mathematics is an integral part of instruction in the mathematics classroom, where the learning of mathematics is an active process.
Thursdays: April 2–June 18; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class April 23.

MAT635 Introduction to Calculus (3)
This course will provide students with a rapid but thorough review of the theory and applications of the first two semesters of College Calculus. It would be an appropriate course both for those teachers who are looking forward to teaching Calculus, as well as for those who would like to refresh their recall of basic Calculus concepts and techniques. The following standard Calculus topics will be studied: Basic properties of Elementary Functions, Limits of Functions, Derivatives: Properties and Applications, Integrals: Properties and Applications, Techniques of Integration, Inverse Functions, Differential Equations, Indeterminate Forms, Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates, Infinite Sequences and Series. A TI-84 Plus calculator is required.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students.

PHY624 Astronomy (3)
Important topics in modern astronomy for both science and nonscience majors including light, telescopes, planets, normal stars, pulsars, black holes, galaxies, quasars and origin of universe.
Schedule to be determined by professor and enrolled students