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Summer Term Courses

Summer Term 2021 Calendar 

Summer 2021 courses listed below, 2022 courses coming soon. 

For an up-to-the-minute course listing, including class size and available space, see the Summer Term Schedule, which is automatically updated by the Registrar's Office.

Summer I:

4-week (May 16–June 11)
6-week (May 16–June 25)

Summer II:

4-week (July 5–July 30)
6-week (July 5–August 13)

*Please see course-specific start and end dates below.

Online Course Terms:

  1. Synchronous courses include specified days and times, during which the instructor and all students actively engage in an online conversation (chat) or other online experiences together. Synchronous sessions are an essential and required component of the course, so please note these days and times as you register.
  2. Asynchronous courses require all students to participate in an online exchange (e.g., discussion board) on the days indicated, but permit a flexible schedule within that time.
  3. Hybrid courses employ a combination of traditional and online teaching methods. Portions of the course take place in a physical classroom, but online methods are also used to present course content, to help students explore and engage with course materials and ideas, and to cultivate academic dialogue.

ART152 American Art History: Cultural Encounter  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Deborah Stanton
ScheduleMay 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Fine Arts

Course Description
The study of American visual arts as they articulate cross-cultural encounters, from the times of diverse Native groups, through later engagement with European colonizers, African slaves, and immigrants. Rather than defining a national identity within American arts, this study investigates the conversation between the many cultures and styles that have taken American art from a second-rate status in the European art world to recognition of America as a modern, global art leader. The student should complete this course with a general understanding of the progression of American art, including Native works and later works in European, African and Asian traditions; the students will also gain the ability to analyze a work of art using basic visual and critical criteria.

ART152 Syllabus


BCM101 Old Testament History, Literature & Theology   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Ted Hildebrandt
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous: Exams on Saturdays)

Core Credit: Common Core Old Testament

Course Description
This course will introduce you to the content, background history and theological implications of much of the Old Testament—mediated through a series of online interactive videos (lecture-quiz), interactive quizzes and introductory texts. The text of the Old Testament will be available in full text and audio formats. There will be quizzes every other day on the contents of the assigned Old Testament text and exams on Saturdays on the video-quiz assignments. There will also be group interaction via blogging and other social media connections, where discussions will be facilitated.

BCM101 Syllabus


BCM103 New Testament History, Literature, and Theology  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Steve Hunt
Schedule: May 17–June 26; MR 7–8 p.m. (Online Synchronous)

Core Credit: Common Core New Testament

Course Description
Examines history and teachings of the New Testament in political, social and religious contexts. Highlights important theological themes such as sin, grace, justification by faith, and the Kingdom of God.

BCM103 Syllabus


BCM308A Christian Theology  http://www.gordon.edu/images/flash/mayterm/comp.gif  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Mark Cannister 
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)

BCM308A Syllabus


BCM308B Christian Theology   http://www.gordon.edu/images/flash/mayterm/comp.gif  
Credits: 4 
Instructor: Mark Cannister 
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)

BCM308B Syllabus


BCM308C and BCM308D Christian Theology  http://www.gordon.edu/images/flash/mayterm/comp.gif   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Amy Hughes 
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)

BCM308C Syllabus


BCM308D and BCM308D Christian Theology  http://www.gordon.edu/images/flash/mayterm/comp.gif   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Amy Hughes 
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)

BCM308D Syllabus


BCM308E Christian Theology  http://www.gordon.edu/images/flash/mayterm/comp.gif    
Credits: 4
Instructor: Sharon Ketcham
Schedule: July 6–July 31 (Online Asynchronous)

BCM308E Syllabus

Core Credit: Common Core Theology

Course Description
This course introduces students to the key ideas, traditions, and people who have shaped the development of Christian theology from antiquity to the present. Students are invited to the study and reflection on theology as a foundation for Christian thought, as a guide to the Church, and as a primary resource for living reflective lives in response to the gospel. Prerequisites: COR/BCM 101, COR/BCM103

Please note that students need dependable, high-speed internet access multiple times each day MTWRF. The course includes a daily rhythm of posting blogs, reviewing lectures, reading study materials, and participating in a discussion board.


ECB211 Statistics in Business and Economics  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Margaret Niehaus
Schedule: May 17–August 14 (Online Asynchronous)

Course Description
Explores basic tools of descriptive and inferential statistics; applies probability theory, estimation, hypothesis testing and regression techniques to business and economic analysis.

ECB211 Syllabus


ECB362 Cost Accounting 
Credit: 4
Instructor: Andy Moore
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Course Description
Examines accounting issues related to the determination of cost of goods and services in manufacturing or service organization; cost behavior, job order and process cost systems, budgeting and standard costing. 

Prerequisite(s): ECB101, ECB118

ECB362 Syllabus


ENG140 A Core Seminar in Literature: Climate Fictions 
Credits: 4
Instructor: Andrew Logemann
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Literature

Course Description
Climate fiction (or “cli-fi”) is a growing genre of literature that imagines the present and future impacts of climate change on the earth and its inhabitants. Many (but not all) works of climate fiction grow out of the wider genres of science fiction and speculative fiction, which also consider alternate worlds and narrate possible futures for humanity. In this course, we will read works of fiction and scientific writing that engage with climate change in various ways, seeking to understand the relationship between human culture and the earth’s climate. As we examine this diverse, interdisciplinary group of texts, we will consider the relationships between scientific and literary communities, appreciate the creativity and imagination involved in science, and reflect on literature’s ability to critique and assess the role of science in culture. In this course, our central questions will be: How can literature represent climate change (something so gradual, and yet so huge, that can feel like it is beyond our ability to understand or respond to it)? Can literature shape our conceptions of the earth and our role in caring for it? How are writers from diverse cultures narrating their experience of climate change?

ENG140A Syllabus


ENG140 B Core Seminar in Literature: Magical Realism 
Credits: 4
Instructor: Andrew Logemann
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Literature

Course Description
Magical realism is a global genre of fiction that uses experimental narrative techniques to tell stories in striking and unsettling ways. According to critic Roger Holland, magical realist texts “re-imagin[e] ‘reality’ in ways that challenge readers to deconstruct both text and the contexts in which they live. A ‘book’ classified as magic realism tells its stories from the perspective of people who live in our world and experience a different reality from the one we call reality.” In magical realism, the supernatural becomes an unremarkable, unquestioned part of reality, while aspects of ordinary life are rendered strange and extraordinary. We will read novels and short stories from different cultural contexts–South America, North America, South Asia–to compare the ways these writers use magical realist techniques and the effects they have for us as part of their global audience.

ENG140B Syllabus


GEN 171 Exploration of Career and Calling 
Credits: 2
Instructor: Greg Bish 
Schedule: May 17-June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Course Description
This online asynchronous course equips students from any major to explore one’s calling and career and create a vision for an integrated, well-lived life. Students will acquire practical tools to begin to understand one’s calling and will apply design thinking principles to their academic major and career exploration.

GEN171 Syllabus


HIS121 Historical Perspectives  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Beverly Armstrong
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Common Core

Course Description
Examines the human activity of culture building, development and change within societies, and the interaction of diverse people groups across a broad swathe of history. Explores the story of Christianity from its roots in the ancient Middle East through the early modern European Renaissance and Reformations to more recent flourishing in the global cultures of the contemporary world, in the context of political, technological, social, and cultural developments. Explores Christian traditions, missionary endeavors, reform movements, and relationships between historic adherents of different world religions. Particular attention is paid to worldviews and the interface of religious belief, systems of thought, and actions taken by individuals and groups. Introduces students to the critical evaluation of historical evidence found in primary source documents, oral tradition, and material culture.

HIS121 Syllabus


KIN/BIO213 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (with lab)   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Sean Clark
Schedule: May 17-June 26 (Online Asynchronous)
**Lab fee: see tuition page for lab fees**

Core Credit: Natural Sciences 

Course Description
Human anatomy and physiology comprise two complementary branches of science that describe the structure (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body. To the first-time student, the study of anatomy may seem very concrete as it traditionally involves considerable memorization of the many structures of the human body. However, anatomy is not just the memorization of a large number of body structures, rather, it is a systematic examination and recognition of the relationship of structure to function and provides the foundation for understanding physiology. Likewise, the study of physiology may seem somewhat more abstract than anatomy, since it appears more integrative and often begins by asking the question, “how does this system (or organ or cell) work?” and continues as one seeks to find some cause-and-effect explanation to the “how” question. This course employs a systems approach wherein the study of anatomy is integrated with the study of physiology as we cover some cell physiology and histology, the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems.

KIN213 Syllabus


KIN/BIO214 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (with lab)   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Sean Clark 
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)
**Lab fee: see tuition page for lab fees**

Core Credit: Natural Sciences

Course Description
Examines the structure and function of the human body. Emphasizes organ systems: skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, respiratory, circulatory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive.

KIN214 Syllabus


LAT101 S Beginning Latin I  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Ian Drummond
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Common Core

Course Description
Introduction to classical Latin language and aspects of Roman culture and history. Covers fundamentals of grammar, morphology and syntax, along with readings from Latin prose literature (e.g., Caesar, Sallust, Cicero and Livy). Emphasis on developing facility in reading Latin texts including reading aloud. 

LAT101/102 Syllabus


LAT102 S Beginning Latin II  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Ian Drummond
Schedule: July 6–Aug 14 (Online Asynchronous)
Gordon students email registrar@gordon.edu to register for Summer II after online registration is closed for the summer.

Core Credit: Common Core

Course Description
Introduction to classical Latin language and aspects of Roman culture and history. Covers fundamentals of grammar, morphology and syntax, along with readings from Latin prose literature (e.g., Caesar, Sallust, Cicero and Livy). Emphasis on developing facility in reading Latin texts including reading aloud. 

Prerequisite(s): LAT101

LAT101/102 Syllabus


NSM202 The Scientific Enterprise 
Credits: 4
Instructor: Craig Story
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)
**Lab fee: see tuition page for lab fees**

Core Credit: Common Core

Course Description
Explores characteristics of natural science, studies theories related to fundamental concepts such as matter and energy to help understand patterns and processes in nature. Stresses relevance of science to contemporary issues and a Christian worldview. Unique nature of this course requires matriculated students to take NSM202 at Gordon College. Activity fee.

Prerequisite(s): BCM 101, COR 107 or COR 109, sophomore standing, or permission of the course director.

NSM202 Syllabus


PHI118 The Examined Life   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Mark Gedney
Schedule: May 17–June 26 (Online Asynchronous)

Core Credit: Common Core Philosophy

Course Description
Introduces students to important historical and thematic issues about what it means to be human:  Who are we? What is your place in the cosmos and how do we relate to the natural world around us? What does it mean to find an object or work of art beautiful? What does it mean to live well as opposed to just living? What is the best way to live well together as a society of persons? And how, given that we are made in God's image, are we to understand our relationship to God?

PHI118 Syllabus


POL104 American National Politics   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Timothy Sherratt
Schedule: July 6–July 31 (Online Asynchronous)    
Gordon students email registrar@gordon.edu to register for Summer II after online registration is closed for the summer.

Core Credit: Social Sciences

Course Description
Critically examines basic commitments, institutions and processes of American politics; engages contemporary political debate; focuses on Constitution, political culture, interest groups, parties, Congress, Presidency and Supreme Court.

POL104 Syllabus


PSY180 Person in Psychological Context   
Credits: 4
Instructor: Susan Bobb
Schedule: May 17–June 12 (Online Asynchronous)  

Core Credit: Social Sciences

Course Description
Formerly PSY220. Explores psychological perspectives on the nature of the person in cross-cultural context. Focuses on research and theory as well as an introduction to the discipline. Topics addressed include development, social behavior, physiology, personality, memory, diagnosis, and treatment. This course covers the basic topics in psychology, including psychoanalysis, rat learning, principles of attraction, and motivation. PSY180 is a prerequisite for upper-level psychology courses.

PSY180 Syllabus


PSY245 Life Span Development Psychology  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Kaye Cook
Schedule: May 17–June 26; R 8–9 p.m. (Online Asynchronous)

Course Description
Surveys social, intellectual and vocational issues predominant during adolescence, adulthood and aging. Discussion format.

PSY245 Syllabus


PSY246 Psychological Disorders  
Credits: 4
Instructor: Daniel Norton 
Schedule: July 6- July 31 (Online Asynchronous)
Gordon students email registrar@gordon.edu to register for Summer II after online registration is closed for the summer.

Course Description
Surveys psychopathology including psychosis, anxiety disorders, mood disorders and addictions; history of treatment and theory; current perspectives in treatment and prevention.

Prerequisite(s): PSY 180