Chemistry
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Chemistry Courses

CHE111 Principles of Chemistry I (4)
Presents fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry: stoichiometry; atomic structure; thermochemistry; elementary quantum theory; chemical periodicity; chemical bonding; molecular structure and geometry; properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions; kinetic theory; and phase equilibria. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative measurement and develops investigative techniques and ability to interpret results. Previous high school or introductory college chemistry course strongly recommended. Core physical science lab option. Lab fee.

CHE112 Principles of Chemistry II (4)
Continues presentation of fundamental principles and concepts of chemistry: chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, elementary thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative measurement and develops investigative techniques and ability to interpret results. Prerequisite: CHE111 or equivalent. Lab fee.

*CH201 Forensic Science (4)
Forensic science is a multi-disciplinary enterprise covering scientific concepts and tools in a number of different scientific fields. This course has an emphasis on chemistry aspects of investigations, but explores other aspects of forensics such as the criminal justice system, justice, and how law and science intersect. This course allows students who want to learn about forensics and be “hands-on” in the lab. Students will interact and learn to be comfortable with some scientific principles and ideas while exploring where science can (and should) play a role in society. Thematic Core: Natural World or Civic Responsibility. Lab fee.

CHE211 Organic Chemistry I (4)
Considers importance of carbon chemistry in our lives and world, and emphasizes the application of principles of green chemistry in this field. Surveys representative organic compounds; discusses alkanes, alkenes and alkynes, and structure, properties, synthesis and reactions of these molecules. Laboratory focuses on development of basic macro and micro techniques common to organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE112. Lab fee.

CHE212 Organic Chemistry II (4)

Continues discussion of classes of organic molecules including aromatic and organometallic compounds, alcohols, ethers, amines and carbonyl compounds, with continued emphasis on applying principles of green chemistry in organic chemistry. Emphasizes elucidation of molecular structure via instrumental techniques such as IR and NMR. Laboratory builds upon techniques with additional preparative chemistry and with classification and identification of unknown compounds. Prerequisite: CHE211. Lab fee.

CHE311 Quantitative Analysis (4)
This analytical chemistry course surveys classical analytical applications of statistics, chemical equilibria and electrochemistry. Laboratory includes acid-base, precipitation, redox, potentiometry and complexation methods along with use of computer software to collect and analyze data. Prerequisite: CHE112. Lab fee. (Alternate years. Offered 2009–10.)

CHE312 Instrumental Analysis (4)

This analytical chemistry course introduces instrumental methods of  quantitative and qualitative analysis, including chromatography (gas and liquid), spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, FTIR, AA, NMR, mass) and associated hyphenated techniques (gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry). Laboratory emphasizes environmental and bioanalytical applications. Prerequisite: CHE311, or CHE112 and permission of instructor. Lab fee.

CHE315 Physical Chemistry I (4)
Examines thermodynamics and kinetics. Thermodynamics topics: gas equations of state and kinetic theory of gases; laws of thermodynamics; entropy; free energy; chemical equilibrium; and phase equilibrium of one- and two-component systems. Kinetics topics: empirical chemical kinetics and reaction rate theory. Laboratory involves experiments in calorimetry and empirical kinetics. Prerequisites: CHE112 and PHY122. Lab fee. (Alternate years. Offered 2010–11.)

CHE316 Physical Chemistry II (4)
Considers quantum chemistry and spectroscopy. Topics include postulates of quantum mechanics, particle in a box, harmonic oscillator and vibrational spectra, rigid rotor and rotational spectra, vibration-rotation spectra, hydrogen atom, many-electron atoms, and atomic spectra. Laboratory demonstrates application of spectroscopic theory to actual molecular spectra. Prerequisites: CHE112 and PHY122. Lab fee. (Alternate years. Offered 2010–11.)

CHE341/BIO341 Biochemistry (4)
See BY341 course description. Lab fee.

CHE371, 372  Selected Topics in Chemistry I, II (2, 2)
Examines topics of instructor's choice not covered elsewhere in curriculum. Examples of such topics include computational organic chemistry, advanced organic synthesis and reaction mechanisms, bioinorganic chemistry, transition-metal reaction mechanisms, theory of molecular electronic structure, and statistical mechanics. Students may enroll more than once if topic is different.

CHE391, 392 Junior Seminar I, II (0, 0)
Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment.

CHE411 Inorganic Chemistry (4)
Advanced course emphasizing coordination chemistry of the transition metal elements. Topics include symmetry and group theory; vibrational spectroscopy; molecular orbital theory; structures, bonding, electronic spectra, reactions and mechanisms of coordination complexes; and structures and reactions of organometallic compounds. Prerequisite: CHE112.

CHE471, 472  Research I, II (1
4, 14)
Research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science. Library searches, laboratory investigation, and written and oral reports may be required.

CHE473, 474, 475, 476 Research III, IV, V, VI (all 14)
Ongoing research under supervision of faculty member in chemistry or related science.

CHE491, 492 Senior Seminar I, II (1, 1)
Explores theological, philosophical and ethical issues related to chemistry and physics. Also considers opportunities for postbaccalaureate education and employment. Requires students to prepare and deliver oral presentations using presentation software.

*NSM202 The Scientific Enterprise (4)
Explores characteristics of natural science, studies theories related to fundamental concepts such as matter and energy to help understand patterns and processes in nature. Stresses relevance of science to contemporary issues and a Christian worldview.

* Fulfills a Core Curriculum requirement.