Center for Faith and Inquiry
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Past Fellows

2013–14

Brian Glenney
Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Craig Story
Associate Professor of Biology
Mike Veatch
Professor of Mathematics
A NEW APPROACH TO THEISTIC EVOLUTION: DETERMINATE OUTCOMES OF RANDOM PROCESSES: Random biological processes in humans, like those involved in genetic adaptations to an environment and adaptive immunity to disease, challenge traditional religious narratives of a divine being directly creating and sustaining human beings. This project considers the possibility that these genetic mechanisms, though random in the individual modifications produced, operate on such a large scale that the overall outcome is, in important respects, determinate. The possibility of these random processes being determinate provides a novel basis for religious narratives that involve indirect divine creation and sustenance of human beings. Such narratives are also consistent with what we know of human biology.

Ruth Melkonian-Hoover
Associate Professor of Political Science
AMERICAN EVANGELICALISM AND IMMIGRATION REFORM: This study is designed to assess impacts of Christian organizational advocacy within churches aimed at changing attitudes on immigration reform. In cooperation with World Relief (WR), professor Melkonian-Hoover will evaluate the outcomes of its advocacy on attitudes of evangelicals concerning immigration and comprehensive immigration reform (CIR). She plans to pursue this research by undertaking focused surveys and interviews of parishioners of churches in two key sites in which WR has concentrated its efforts, Denver and Chicago. She will complement this research with analysis of recent public opinion data (Pew data from 2011 and 2012) evaluating non-religious factors (economic, partisan, etc.) as well as religious factors shaping evangelical attitudes on immigration and CIR.

Karl-Dieter Crisman
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
THE MORAL CASE FOR OPEN-SOURCE SOFTWARE: Most of us are now familiar with the distinction between programs 'on the desktop' and 'in the cloud.' Similarly, one would have to withdraw from society not to understand the distinction between software you pay for and software you do not have to pay for. But there is a third, crucial distinction. It is the one between proprietary software and open-source software, and it is only vaguely understood by most of us. Over his time at Gordon, professor Crisman has become convinced that this distinction is of great significance, one with deep resonance with Christian thinking as well as practical implications for his teaching. Through his ongoing research and this Fellowship, he hopes to reach out to academic and lay audiences with this message.


 

2006–07

Dr. Janis Flint-Ferguson
Professor of English
Her project focuses on disseminating her research on the use of the fine arts as integrated into general classroom learning in schools.

Dr. John Skillen
Professor of English
His project focuses largely on augmenting his work with the Gordon in Orvieto Italy program, integrating the fine arts and disseminating that work to the town and diocese of Orvieto.

Dr. Bruce Webb
Professor of Economics and Business
His project focuses on the development of a college-level textbook on economics.


 

2005–06

Bryan C. Auday
Professor of Psychology
His project focused on disseminating his work on neuropsychology and religion to a wider audience.

Brian L. Johnson
Assistant Professor of English
His project focused on the development of a biography focusing on the religious aspect of W.E.B. Du Bois' life.

Dorothy Boorse
Assistant Professor of Biology
Her project is titled "Loving the Land: Forming a Sense of Place." Her project sought to bring the love of land to the broader community with a series of experiences and resources that foster a sense of place and greater awe of God. Learn more >>

Paul Borgman

Professor of English
His project focused on using current technology to create multimedia formats for presenting studies on biblical narratives for use in churches and academic settings.

Kaye Cook

Professor of Psychology
Her project, entitled "Virtue in Context: Conflict Resolution in Multicultural Churches," focused on developing a better understanding of virtue in different cultures and applying that to churches with congregations of diverse cultural backgrounds.

Jennifer Hevelone-Harper
Assistant Professor of History
Her project, entitled "Cloud of Witnesses: Spiritual Parents from the Early and Medieval Church," focused on developing a text to gain better understanding of the spiritual heritage passed on from the historical church.

Dr. Bruce Webb
Professor of Economics and Business
His project focuses on the development of a college-level textbook on economics.

Dr. Janis Flint-Ferguson
Professor of English
Her project focuses on disseminating her research on the use of the fine arts as integrated into general classroom learning in schools.


 

2004–05

Bruce Herman
Professor of Art
His project, entitled "Six Public Dialogues on Art and Faith," sought to bridge the gap between the contemporary Christian artist and the church layperson. Learn more >>

Kaye Cook
Professor of Psychology
Her project, entitled "Virtue in Context: Conflict Resolution in Multicultural Churches," focused on developing a better understanding of virtue in different cultures and applying that to churches with congregations of diverse cultural backgrounds.

Paul Borgman
Professor of English
His project focused on using current technology to create multimedia formats for presenting studies on biblical narratives for use in churches and academic settings.

Dorothy Boorse 
Assistant Professor of Biology
Her project is titled "Loving the Land: Forming a Sense of Place." Her project sought to bring the love of land to the broader community with a series of experiences and resources that foster a sense of place and greater awe of God. Learn more >>


 

2003–04

Jennifer Hevelone-Harper
Assistant Professor of History
Her project, entitled "Cloud of Witnesses: Spiritual Parents from the Early and Medieval Church," focused on developing a text to gain better understanding of the spiritual heritage passed on from the historical church.

Bruce Herman
Professor of Art
His project, entitled "Six Public Dialogues on Art and Faith," sought to bridge the gap between the contemporary Christian artist and the church layperson. Learn more >>