Content Area Courses

Featured Content Area Courses
Need PDPs? Gordon's Graduate Education program offers courses that provide three graduate credits and 67.5 Professional Development Points.

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SPRING 2016

ART620 Photography (3)
In this course, we will consider basic concepts of composition, exposure, and shooting technique important for the aspiring photographer to begin to master. Topics will vary based on student background and interests, but may include: the exposure triangle (ISO, shutter speed, aperture), white balance, available light and fill flash, using the camera’s histogram, and basic composition. This is a hands-on course: we will spend a lot of time shooting and critiquing each other's photos, and cover techniques for portraiture, landscapes and nature, and events. We will not discuss image processing software per se, but may incorporate it as it arises from student questions (in other words, this course is about photography, not Photoshop). As an education course, we will consider how to incorporate photography into the classroom. Students will complete several small photography assignments and a final project. Must have a camera (DSLR preferred) and computer. 
First class: Monday, April 11; 5-7 p.m.  
Remaining schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students at first meeting.

BIO635 Environmental Science (3)
This course will focus on the broad range of scientific topics concerning the environment. Topics will be selected that are relevant to teaching and that will provide necessary background to understand science and the environment for primary and secondary education. The focus will be conservation biology and the biology of environmental science.
April 16, April 30, June 11, and June 18; 12–6 p.m. $25 lab fee.

ENG640 Contemporary American Fiction and Visual Media (3)
Explores the influence of visual media over culture in recent American literature; a theme most deeply explored by David Foster Wallace.
Online. Begins April 18.

HIS647 The Ancient Roman World (3)
In this course, we will consider the entire sweep of Roman history, from the legendary founding myths of Aeneas and Romulus through the Republic, Empire, and eventual “fall” in the West. We will read both primary and secondary sources, particularly with an eye towards using them in a teaching context. Specific topics in Roman history and culture to be arranged with students. The course could incorporate readings in Latin if desired by students.
Wednesday, April 13, 5–8 p.m.; Friday, April 29, 5–8 p.m.; and Saturday, April 30, 9 a.m.–2 p.m. Additional time to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: April 5–June 21; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class April 19.

MAT605 Mathematics and the Greeks (3)
Mondays, April 4–June 20; 5:30–9:15pm
No class April 18 and May 30.

SPN695 21st Century Latin American Cinema (3)
Examines films released between 2000 and 2012 that are written, directed and/or produced by Latin American filmmakers or set in Latin American spaces. Students will gain a broader understanding of contemporary Latin America cinema, allowing for criticism of different meanings, symbols, styles, experiences, and fostering emotional and rational responses. Conducted in Spanish.
Selected Saturdays: 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m.; April 2–June 18 (specific dates TBD)

 

SUMMER 2016

ART650 Street Art: A Culture of Social and Political Change (3)
Street art has become a global means of cultural, social, and political reform. Numerous forms, genres, and strategies for street art generate new forms of communication and meaning, giving visibility to marginalized voices. Some of the leading practitioners and innovative kinds of work being done from the 1990s to the present including: Banksy, Shephard Fairey, Os Gemeos, Barry McGee, Hot Tea, JR, Swoon, Zevs etc.. Questions considered: how did "street art" and "graffiti " become a legitimized form of cultural transmission? How does an "outsider" form of art become a privileged category "inside" established art and media institutions? What effect does this privilege have on the legitimacy of street art itself? What influence do media coverage, rebel persona, identity politics, and art world institutions have on the credibility and authenticity of street art? Upon completion of this course, students should be able to engage in critical thinking, semiotics, and urban anthropology to apply critical imagination in the decoding of subversive artifacts, and to interpret the streets and other public spaces of urban landscapes.
Online course. Begins July 11.

BIO625 Nutrition (3)
Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions, and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Weekends: Friday, July 8, 5–8 p.m.; Saturday, July 9, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; Friday, July 29, 9 a.m.–4 p.m.; Saturday, July 30, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; Friday, August 12, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. and Saturday, August 13, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

BIO637 The Biology of Earth and Space (3)
This course will include basic astronomy, meteorology, geology, and oceanography and will include topics from plate tectonics to climate change, to the history of earth and the universe. The class emphasis will be on activities, field trips and laboratories for these topics.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.
$25 lab fee.

BIO640 The Mathematics of Science (3)
Examines connections between and integration of mathematics and science. Focuses on the content of science classes that use math. 
July 18–22; 9 a.m.–12 p.m.  Additional hours to be arranged if needed.

BIO641 Biochemistry (3)
Explores inner workings of cellular metabolism, starting with basic biomolecules such as amino acids and building to biosynthesis and maintenance of body homeostasis. 
$25 Lab fee.  Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.  

CHE663 Selected Topics in Chemistry: Nutrition (3)
Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions, and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Weekends: Friday, July 8, 5–8 p.m.; Saturday, July 9, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; Friday, July 29, 9 a.m.–4 p.m.; Saturday, July 30, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.; Friday, August 12, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. and Saturday, August 13, 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

ENG638 General Linguistics (3)
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

EDU655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school. In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but will also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings. The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG632 Literature for Adolescents (3)
In-depth examination of literature for young adults used thematically throughout middle school and secondary curricula. Draws on experience of participants to examine cross-cultural implication of literature.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG635 Shakespeare - Active in Class & History (3)
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates use of literature within writing.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

FRE673 Selected Topics: Immigration in Contemporary France — La France arabe (3)
The theme of the difficulty of the assimilation of immigrants from the Maghreb into contemporary French life, the problems that face their younger generations with integration and acceptance, and the Islamophobia that permeates modern French culture will be explored through novels, short stories, news articles and music videos. Student reports as well as “explications de texte” and a paper will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in the public school setting.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS663 Selected Topics: Pathway to Revolution - An Examination of Events Leading Up to and Through the War for Independence (3)
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS672 US Constitution: Origins and Applications (3)
Examines the background, foundations, drafting, implementation, and subsequent history of the U.S. Constitution. Core texts include the Constitution itself and America’s Constitution: A Biography by Yale Law Professor Akhil Reed Amar. This course examines major sections of the Constitution separately and considers how it can be incorporated into individual classroom settings.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS678 Using Museums in the Classroom (3) 
Weekdays: August 1–5; 8 a.m.–4:15 p.m. 
$25 materials fee.

MAT627 Investigating Mathematical Concepts (3)
June 27; 6–9 p.m. and July 11–15; 8:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

MAT636 Mathematical Inquiry (3)
Weekdays: July 25–July 29; 8:30 a.m.–4:45 p.m.

MAT640 The Mathematics of Science (3)
Examines connections between and integration of mathematics and science. Focuses on the content of science classes that use math. 
July 18–22; 9 a.m.–12 p.m.  Additional hours to be arranged if needed.

PHY624 Astronomy (3)
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

PHY625 Electronic Circuits (3)
Examines and explains concepts of electronics, calculating numerical quantities related to analog electronics, such quantities as voltage, current, impedance, power, bandwidth and gain.
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students.

SPN663 Selected Topics: Teatro contemporáneo español: siglo XXI (Contemporary Spanish Theatre: XXI century) (3)
En este curso estudiaremos el teatro español de comienzos del siglo XXI. Cada pieza aquí seleccionada coincide, tal y como la crítica Virtudes Serrano afirma en su antología Teatro breve ente dos siglos, “el deseo de llegar a ser un reflejo directo o metafórico de las preocupaciones de sus respectivos creadores y de los conflictos de los individuos y la sociedad del tiempo de su escritura” (12). La temática que estos dramaturgos escogen es, primordialmente, una que refleja los tremendos acontecimientos que han llenado la actualidad de las primeras décadas del siglo XXI: el terrorismo, la violencia, la inmigración, la falta de vivienda y la marginalidad de los sin techo, la tecnología y sus efectos en la identidad del individuo y la memoria del pasado, entre otros. 
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

SPN675 Advanced Composition and Syntax in Spanish (3)
El objetivo primordial de este curso es repasar y mejorar la gramática y sintaxis española para aplicarla al proceso de redacción y comunicación escritas. Se enfatizarán la ampliación del vocabulario y el dominio de las diferencias léxicas del idioma y se hará hincapié en mejorar la habilidad de escribir en español en cuatro géneros distintos: el descriptivo, el informativo, el narrativo (simple y complejo) y una introducción al expositivo.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

 

FALL 2016

HIS610 Principles of Geography (3)
Tuesdays: August 30–December 13; 5–7 p.m.

HIS673 Selected Topics: Origin and Growth of Colonial Massachusetts (3)
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: September 20–December 6; 6–9 p.m.