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Content Area Courses

Featured Content Area Courses
Need PDPs? Gordon's Graduate Education program offers courses that provide three graduate credits and 67.5 Professional Development Points.

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FALL 2017

BIO637 Earth and Space (3)
Includes basic astronomy, meteorology, geology and oceanography. Topics will range from plate tectonics to climate change to the history of earth and the universe. Emphasis on activities, field trips and laboratories for these topics.
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students.

EDU613 Assistive Technology, Augmentative, and Alternative Forms of Communication (1)
This course reviews common assistive technology, augmentative communication and alternative forms of communication for the classroom. Throughout the course, participants have the opportunity to observe and identify various ways to help their students access curriculum using these techniques. Students will also build a personal library of resources to assist their work in the classroom. 
This is a Self-guided Online Course.
September–December 2017

BIO637 Earth and Space (3)
Includes basic astronomy, meteorology, geology and oceanography. Topics will range from plate tectonics to climate change to the history of earth and the universe. Emphasis on activities, field trips and laboratories for these topics.
Schedule to be arranged between professor and enrolled students.

ENG604 Advanced Grammar for Writing (3)
Studies and analyzes grammar systems and syntax of English language. Includes the roles of grammar in the construction of written style and pedagogical implications in schools.
Begins week of October 2
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG635 Shakespeare Active in Class and History (3)
The reading and performance of Shakespeare has been part of the English classroom canon in both high school and college for many years. This course addresses both the historical context of Shakespeare’s plays and the themes within the plays. Strategies to make the reading and performance of Shakespeare’s plays are examined.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students. 

ENG673 Selected Topic: Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Developing Writers encourages teachers and learners at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom. The course will (1) learn practical writing strategies; (2) increase awareness of oneself as a writer and boost confidence and skill; (3) learn more about the experiences and development of certain successful authors, and use suggestions for reflective writing; and (4) compile a portfolio of written work. The course offers an opportunity to write and share your writing. It also will give a chance to offer honest and enthusiastic help to others. The course offers flexibility in that it can accommodate the writing interests and goals of each student—whether informational/academic/technical writing or creative fiction or nonfiction. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates the use of literature within writing. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

FRE670 Tales, Shadows and Metaphors of World War II in France (3)
Threat, invasion, occupation and loss of freedom. Struggle for national identity. Voices of desperation, voices of hope. Silence. Tragedy, courage and optimism. Quiet assistance, underground resistance. Stories of the brave partisans who repelled the German threat, lessons learned from the War through literature and self-expression, metaphors of hope in the veiled works of those who lived the War. Through reading (novels, poetry and theater) and films, students will gain insight into the war that changed France forever in so many ways. Student reports as well as "explications de texte" will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in the public school setting.
Hybrid course with 6 class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule to be determined by students and the professor.

FRE677 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Knights in shining armor, damsels in distress, evil and treachery, saints and sinners, defense of the nation at all costs, giants and birdmen, courtroom in disarray, enchantment, swords and hangman's nooses, magic potions, ribald poems, love poems, invisibility rings, quest for the Holy Grail, a plague and the search for self. Today's problems are anticipated by the classics of French medieval literature. Student presentations as well as "explications de texte" will be required. Some attention will be given to culling segments of the works for use in a secondary setting.
Hybrid course with 6 class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule to be determined by students and the professor.

HIS672 U.S. Constitution (3)
Examines the background, foundations, drafting, implementation, and subsequent history of the U.S. Constitution. Core texts include the Constitution itself and America's Constitution: A Biography by Yale Law Professor Akhil Reed Amar. This course examines major sections of the Constitution separately and considers how it can be incorporated into individual classroom settings.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

KIN620/PHY620/BIO620 Computational Biomechanics: Modeling of Musculoskeletal Systems (3)
Examines the application of advanced kinematic and kinetic analyses in the assessment of human motion. Concepts of data processing, three-dimensional analysis, mechanical modeling and energy and power analysis applied in sport and rehabilitation contexts. Special emphasis on analysis of locomotion.

MAT601 Mathematics (3)
Reviews and strengthens basic algebra and precalculus concepts in the context of understanding and using functions to analyze and model real-world data, focusing on functions (including linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions) and exploring them with and utilizing them for graphing, data analysis, problem investigation and problem solution.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: September 20–December 6, 6–9 p.m.

 

WINTER 2018

ART663 Selected Topics: Ceramics (3)
Create stoneware functional pieces on pottery wheels in addition to crafting unique hand-built pieces (pinch pots, coil pots, slab pieces). Finish pieces from a selection of over 25 high fire glazes. Small classes focus on individualized attention. All clay and materials are provided. Lab fee due at the end of the session to the professor is a firing charge of $4.75/lb. of finished, glazed pots.
Thursdays: January 4–March 1; 6–9 p.m.
No class February 22

BIO625 Nutrition (3)
Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis.  Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions and importance of water.  Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Mondays: Beginning January 29th   6–9 p.m.
 

BIO673 Selected Topics in Biology: Cancer Biology (3)
Tuesdays: January 23 – May 8; 6–7:30 p.m.
No class February 20

CHE673 Selected Topics:  Green Chemistry  (3)
Green chemistry, also known as sustainable chemistry, is the design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substances. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product, including its design, manufacture, and use.
$25 Lab fee. Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.
$25 lab fee.
Starts week of January 22nd

EDU655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school.  In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings.  The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Online course

ENG638  General Linguistics (3)
Mondays: January 8–March 26; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class January 15 and February 19.

ENG635 Shakespeare, Active in Class & History (3) The reading and performance of Shakespeare has been part of the English classroom canon in both high school and college for many years. This course addresses both the historical context of Shakespeare’s plays and the themes within the plays. Strategies to make the reading and performance of Shakespeare’s plays are examined.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG673 Selected Topics: Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Developing Writers encourages teachers and learners at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom. The course will (1) learn practical writing strategies; (2) increase awareness of oneself as a writer and boost confidence and skill; (3) learn more about the experiences and development of certain successful authors, and use suggestions for reflective writing; and (4) compile a portfolio of written work. The course offers an opportunity to write and share your writing. It also will give a chance to offer honest and enthusiastic help to others. The course offers flexibility in that it can accommodate the writing interests and goals of each student—whether informational/academic/technical writing or creative fiction or nonfiction.  The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates the use of literature within writing. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG643 The History and Literature of the Ancient Greeks (3)
Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

FRE639 French Linguistics, Phonetics and Advanced Grammar (3)
What you need to know.  Why do they do that?  A study of the linguistic structure of French: looking at how the language is put together, how pronunciation and grammar work together and why the French say it "that way".  How do they do that?  An analysis of the phonetics and the pronunciation of French, so important to French speakers, which will furnish an understanding of the sound system and it's relevance to the message. What tools do they use? An inquiry into the finer points of French grammar and syntax that have eluded many French speakers. Student reports and interpretation will be required. Some attention will be given to adapting some items to the public school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

FRE675 Le Roman initiatique dans la Francophonie: Coming of Age Novels in the Literature of the French-Speaking World (3)
A study of children and childhood as they grow to become part of the French-speaking world.  The trio of culture, identity and crisis will be a central theme as we investigate readings from France, Africa, Haiti, Guadeloupe, the Maghreb and Canada. Reading, discussion, interpretation and explication de texte.  Attention will be given to adapting readings to a secondary school setting.
A hybrid course with class meetings that will fit YOUR schedule. Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS643 The History and Literature of the Ancient Greeks (3)
Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS644 The Ancient Greek World (3)
Explores the worlds of Hesiod and Homer, Aeschylus and Pericles, Alexander the Great and Paul the Apostle. Specific topics will be arranged in consultation with students' academic and teaching interests. 
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS650 History of Renaissance and Reformation (3)
From the roots of the Reformation in Late Medieval/Renaissance Europe, we will begin our exploration of Martin Luther's angst, his "95 Theses" and subsequent writings. We will then consider expression reforms in the first three generations of the Reformation, including the views of leading figures such as Zwingli, Calvin, and those in the English Reformation. We will consider both the "magisterial" and "radical" branches of the Reformation, as well as the Catholic "Counter-Reformation". Particular topics will vary depending on student interest.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS655 Exploring Urban Schools: Character, Culture, and Contexts (3) Explore the literature of ancient Greece from the Trojan War to the time of St. Paul. Historical periods covered will include the Trojan War, the Dark Ages, Greek colonization, the Persian War, the Classical Period, the Peloponnesian War, the conquests of Alexander the Great, and the Hellenistic era. Texts will include in whole or in part The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, The Oresteia of Aeschylus, Oedipus the King of Sophocles, The Histories of Herodotus, The Peloponnesian War of Thucydides and The Symposium of Plato.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

MAT627 Investigating Mathematical Concepts (3)
Tuesdays: January 2–March 27; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class February 20

MAT673 Number Sense (3)
This course will address the progression of number sense concepts from Kindergarten through Grade 8 as they relate to and support instruction in middle school and high school settings. Emphasis will be on deepening teachers’ understanding of arithmetic operations, teaching concepts vs. procedures, and incorporating the Standards for Mathematical Practice.
Weekends: January 5–6; January 19–20; February 2–3; March 2–3
Fridays 6–9 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m.–3 p.m.

 

SPRING 2018

ART620 Photography (3)
In this course, we will consider basic concepts of composition, exposure, and shooting technique. INtroduces fundamentals of cameras, lighting, composition, basics of processing and printing black and white film and use of photography as medium of communication and artistic expression
Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

BIO635 Environmental Science (3)
This course will focus on the broad range of science concerning the environment  Topics will be selected that are relevant to teaching and that will provide the necessary background to understand science and the environment for primary and secondary education. The focus will be conservation biology and the biology of environmental science. 
Schedule to be determined.
$25 lab fee.

ENG673 Selected Topics: Writing for Publishing (3)
In this course students will learn about to prepare a writing sample in the genre of choice for potential publication; write a book proposal; do a market comparison to explore potential competitors to your work; determine your target audience; research potential publishers and agents (including book, journal/magazine, and online venues). The course addresses challenges within academic and trade publishing, how to determine market needs, and how to effectively meet those challenges and needs.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
Developing Writers encourages teachers and learners at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom. The course will (1) learn practical writing strategies; (2) increase awareness of oneself as a writer and boost confidence and skill; (3) learn more about the experiences and development of certain successful authors, and use suggestions for reflective writing; and (4) compile a portfolio of written work. The course offers an opportunity to write and share your writing. It also will give a chance to offer honest and enthusiastic help to others. The course offers flexibility in that it can accommodate the writing interests and goals of each student—whether informational/academic/technical writing or creative fiction or nonfiction. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

ENG675 Advanced Writing (3)
Provides personal direction and group critique of substantial individual writing projects across genres. Integrates the use of literature within writing. The instructor will work with the student to strengthen all aspects of writing and will provide a line by line review, commentary on, and recommendations for revision of writing assignments.
Schedule to be determined between professor and enrolled students.

HIS647 The Ancient Roman World (3)
In this course, we will consider the entire sweep of Roman history, from the legendary founding myths of Aeneas and Romulus through the Republic, Empire, and the eventual "fall" in the West. We will read both primary and secondary sources, particularly with an eye towards using them in a teaching context.  Specific topics in Roman history and culture to be arranged with students.  The course could incorporate readings in Latin if desired by students.
 Schedule to be determined between faculty and enrolled students.

MAT621 Modeling Mathematics (3)
Tuesdays: April 3–June 18; 6–9:20 p.m.
No class April 17.

MAT605 Mathematics and the Greeks (3)
Mondays, April 2–June 20; 5:30–9:15 p.m.
No class April 16 and May 28.