Content Area Courses

Featured Content Area Courses
Need PDPs? Gordon's Graduate Education program offers courses that provide three graduate credits and 67.5 Professional Development Points.

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SUMMER 2015

ART673 Street Art: A Culture of Social and Political Change (3)
Street art has become a global means of cultural, social, and political reform. Numerous forms, genres, and strategies for street art generate new forms of communication and meaning, giving visibility to marginalized voices. Some of the leading practitioners and innovative kinds of work being done from the 1990s to the present including: Banksy, Shephard Fairey, Os Gemeos, Barry McGee, Hot Tea, JR, Swoon, Zevs etc.. Questions considered: how did "street art" and "graffiti " become a legitimized form of cultural transmission? How does an "outsider" form of art become a privileged category "inside" established art and media institutions? What affect does this privilege have on the legitimacy of street art itself. What influence does media coverage, rebel persona, identity politics, and art world institutions have on the credibility and authenticity of street art? Upon completion of this course, students should be able to engage in critical thinking, semiotics, urban anthropology, to apply critical imagination in decoding of subversive artifacts, and to interpret the streets and other public spaces of urban landscapes.
Online course. Begins the end of June.

BIO625 – Nutrition (3)
Explores fundamentals of current nutritional science; emphasizes physiological basis. Analyzes proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and their major functions, and importance of water. Encompasses whole person and integral role of nutrition in human health.
Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

BIO630 - Marine Science (3)
The ocean is a complex environment, and as such, the field of Marine Science is interdisciplinary by its very nature. This course will provide an overview of the four main disciplines of oceanography: geological, chemical, physical and biological oceanography in the classroom and lab, out in the field, and out on the water. 
$25 lab fee. Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

BIO673 Selected Topics: Earth and Space (3)
This course will include basic astronomy, meteorology, geology, and oceanography. Topics will range from plate tectonics to climate change to the history of earth and the universe. The class emphasis will be on activities, field trips and laboratories for these topics.
$25 lab fee. Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

EDU673 Selected Topics: Exploring Urban Schools: Character, culture, and contexts (3)
This course is an overview and study of the character of the urban school. In our consideration of current research and thinking about urban education, students will examine not only the areas of education/pedagogy and sociology, but will also investigate the significant role and impact of economics, culture and multiculturalism, race, politics, the role of government, and social ethics. Designed as a seminar-style course, this study will necessitate meaningful, thoughtful and well-prepared participation in all class meetings. The course is not exhaustive in its consideration of the varied contexts that are interwoven into urban school culture and experience, but time will be taken to be thoughtful and aware, with a concomitant view toward helping teachers engage with the possibilities of social justice within a highly challenged urban educational setting.
Weekdays: August 3–7; 8 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

EDU773 Selected Topics: Data: Collecting, Evaluating & Implementing Change (3)
Data driven instruction and decision making is a hot topic of conversation among administrators and educators in the era of accountability, however the practical application on the ground is much more complex. This course will explore how data can be collected, the problem solving and analysis processes that is required to make meaning from, and drive instructional decisions, as well as the culture and learning community that must be in place to really get to the heart of instructional matters.
Weekdays: July 20–24, 8 a.m.–4:15 p.m.

ENG640 Contemporary American Fiction and Visual Media (3)
Explores the influence of visual media over culture in recent American literature; a theme most deeply explored by David Foster Wallace.
Online course. Begins the end of June.

ENG674 Developing Writers (3)
This course will encourage teachers at all levels to develop as writers and explore practical strategies for the classroom.
Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

HIS678 Using Museums in the Classroom (3)
Weekdays: July 13–17, 8 a.m.–4:15 p.m. $25 fee.

MAT627 Investigating Mathematical Concepts (3)
Weekdays: July 6–10, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

MAT636 Mathematical Inquiry (3)
Weekdays: July 27–July 31, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

PHY636 Modern Physics (3)
Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

PHY672 Thermo Physics (3)
Schedule to be arranged with faculty and students.

POL673 Street Art: A Culture of Social and Political Change (3)
Street art has become a global means of cultural, social, and political reform. Numerous forms, genres, and strategies for street art generate new forms of communication and meaning, giving visibility to marginalized voices. Some of the leading practitioners and innovative kinds of work being done from the 1990s to the present including: Banksy, Shephard Fairey, Os Gemeos, Barry McGee, Hot Tea, JR, Swoon, Zevs etc.. Questions considered: how did "street art" and "graffiti " become a legitimized form of cultural transmission? How does an "outsider" form of art become a privileged category "inside" established art and media institutions? What affect does this privilege have on the legitimacy of street art itself. What influence does media coverage, rebel persona, identity politics, and art world institutions have on the credibility and authenticity of street art? Upon completion of this course, students should be able to engage in critical thinking, semiotics, urban anthropology, to apply critical imagination in decoding of subversive artifacts, and to interpret the streets and other public spaces of urban landscapes.
Online course. Begins the end of June.